America's First Issue: Scroll through the pages of our inaugural edition.

Americas inaugural issue, dated April 17, 1909, featured a report on the 100th anniversary of the Old Saint Patricks Cathedral in New York, a special "cablegram" from France describing the celebrations in honor of St. Joan of Arcs beatification and an appreciative assessment of a "novel form of telescope." There were no pictures, and the ads were grouped together in the back. Sadly, they are not included in our bound volumes, and thus not reproduced here.

To peruse Americas first issue, click here. Note: the file is a PDF, and may take a few minutes to download.

8 years 3 months ago
It would be very interesting to know if the names of the original team presenting America in 1909 were published in the section that was removed from your bound volumes. My parents were married by John LaFarge, S.J., and he appeared at my father's deathbed in Cleveland in 1960 with champagne. A family friend and cousin-by-marriage, Father LaFarge was reputed in our family lore as being a founding member of America. He would have been young in 1909, but sufficiently grown to have been involved in helping to develop a new magazine, and I would be very interested to know if he was indeed. Thank you for sharing this fascinating item from your archives! Mary Warbasse

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