The Dulles Legacy: A selection of the late cardinal's writings for America

Cardinal Avery Dulles, S.J. (1918-2008), whose biography is reviewed in the Nov. 29 issue, wrote for America for over 40 years. Many of his articles were drawn from his Laurence J. McGinley lectures, which he delivered twice yearly at Fordham University since 1988. Below is a selection of articles Cardinal Dulles has written for America over the years, including a few of his McGinley lectures.

"Clarifying the Council," Letter, October 1, 2007

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"What Distinguishes the Jesuits?" January 15, 2007

"The Theologian: A Reflection on the Life of John Paul II," April 18, 2005

"Rights of Accused Priests," June 21, 2004

"A Eucharistic Church," December 20, 2004

"Vatican II: Myth and Reality," February 24, 2003

"An Interview with Avery Dulles," James Martin, S.J., March 5, 2001

"Henri DeLubac: In Appreciation," Sept. 28, 1991

"Leonard Feeney: In Memoriam," February 25, 1978

"Infallibility Revisited," August 4, 1973

"Loyalty and Dissent: After Vatican II," June 27, 1970

"Karl Rahner on ’Humane Vitae,’" September 28, 1968

"Faith and Doubt," March 11, 1967

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