Sad Warren supporters in Iowa reinforce Clinton inevitability

Some Democrats in Iowa are eager for the chance to be disappointed and disillusioned by a Warren presidency.

The Washington Post’s Robert Costa has a great report from Iowa that undercuts its own headline: “Democrats suffering from Clinton fatigue say they’re ready for Warren.” Costa talks with 13 Democrats gathered at the Ames Public Library in support of Elizabeth Warren, the Democratic senator from Massachusetts who has not expressed interest in running for president.

The story begins with some grousing about the dynastic aspect of Hillary Clinton running for president (“I’m utterly tired, tired of the Clintons”), but then it swerves into a poignant look at disenchantment with President Barack Obama. One 74-year-old recalls attending Obama rallies in 2008 and, “raising his arms in exasperation,” asks, “What happened?”

Advertisement

A 57-year-old botanist has the answer: “Should have done single-payer health care, should have done socialized medicine, should have taken on the banks.”

Should have “done” socialized medicine. The Clinton campaign must be praying that this naïvete is typical of the draft-Warren movement. If the typical supporter of another potential challenger from the left, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, also believes that Obama could have gotten something closer to single-payer health care through Congress, Clinton can rest easy about swatting away opposition in Iowa and New Hampshire. She may even plead for Vice President Joe Biden to run so she’ll get some halfway-challenging debate practice.

There is a defensible argument that Obama—a keen thinker, skilled orator, and someone with the inclination to work with members of the opposite party to build a consensus—would have better served the country by staying in the Senate for a couple of decades, building popular support for such ideas as universal health care and free community colleges, instead of further polarizing the country as president. But by the same reasoning, Warren and Sanders should stay put in the Senate.

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement

The latest from america

 10.17.2018 Pope Francis greets Cardinal Blase J. Cupich of Chicago before a session of the Synod of Bishops on young people, the faith and vocational discernment at the Vatican Oct. 16. (CNS photo/Vatican Media)
“We take people where they are, walking with them, moving forward,” Cardinal Blase Cupich said.
Michael J. O’LoughlinOctober 20, 2018
Catherine Pakaluk, who currently teaches at the Catholic University of America and holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University, describes her tweet to Mr. Macron as “spirited” and “playful.”
Emma Winters October 19, 2018
A new proposal from the Department of Homeland Security could make it much more difficult for legal immigrants to get green cards in the United States. But even before its implementation, the proposal has led immigrants to avoid receiving public benefits.
J.D. Long-GarcíaOctober 19, 2018
 Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, then nuncio to the United States, and then-Cardinal Theodore E. McCarrick of Washington, are seen in a combination photo during the beatification Mass of Blessed Miriam Teresa Demjanovich at the Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart in Newark, N.J., Oct. 4, 2014. (CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz)
In this third letter Archbishop Viganò no longer insists, as he did so forcefully in his first letter, that the restrictions that he claimed Benedict XVI had imposed on Archbishop McCarrick—one he alleges that Pope Francis later lifted—can be understood as “sanctions.”
Gerard O’ConnellOctober 19, 2018