Young Adult Pilgrimage(s)

Here’s news from Bill McGarvey, editor of Bustedhalo.com, the website for young adult seekers and believers, about a fun new idea for pilgrimage:

’In an age such as ours, is it possible to reinvigorate that old model 
and bring a spiritual dimension to a 21st century holiday?  Before 
tourism became popular in the 19th century, religious pilgrimages were 
the holidays (derived from the term "holy days") that many people 
took. While they usually involved a sacred destination, medieval 
pilgrims often used their journeys as both social and leisure 
opportunities as well as an occasion to draw closer to God.  Can a 
pilgrimage still be relevant to 20- and 30- something’s whose quest 
for faith is different from their parents and grandparents? Busted 
Halo® believes it can. Sponsored by the Paulist Fathers, BustedHalo—
has designed a pilgrimage experience for people in their 20s and 30s 
who normally wouldn’t be caught dead on a religious pilgrimage. 
Combining cultural, social, spiritual and physical elements, Busted 
Halo’s® Spiritual Seeker Adventures to Paris and the Camino are part 
adventure travel, part European arts and culture vacation and part 
spiritual retreat…but wholly unlike any other type of travel 
experience. They are a rare opportunity to meet other people in their 
20s and 30s who are searching for an adventure that is enjoyable and 
engaging on multiple levels.’

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For more info, check out Bustedhalo.com.

James Martin, SJ

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