Women's Online Retreat

Vinita Hampton Wright is one of my favorite spiritual writers.  (And full disclosure: she was also the copyeditor--and a fantastic one--for my book "My Life with the Saints.")  A few weeks ago I received a copy of her new book, "Days of Deepening Friendship: For the Woman Who Wants Authentic Life with God."  So I picked it up and started coasting through it and was instantly hooked.  I thought, "I shouldn’t be enjoying this so much, as a man!"  It’s a superb book on prayer, informed by Ignatian spirituality, yet presented in a readable, accessible, inviting way.

Now Ms. Wright is hosting an online Lenten retreat for women at the Loyola Press site.  Here’s how the publisher describes it: "Participate in our free online Lenten retreat, based on passages from Days of Deepening Friendship. Each weekly post will encourage further reflection and offer suggestions for spiritual renewal. Participants will also have the opportunity to communicate with each other, as well as with the author, Vinita Hampton Wright."

Here’s the link.  It sounds terrific.  And it’s free!

James Martin, SJ

 

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