Winters on the Dems and Pro-Life Issues

Here’s Michael Sean Winters, America’s regular blogger and author of "Left at the Altar" on slate.com on, the Dems and pro-life issues:

"Catholics for whom abortion is the only issue are never going to vote for pro-choice Democrats. Many others, however, are less certain about both abortion and their party loyalties. For them, an extreme pro-choice posture, such as that seen in banning Casey Sr. from the convention podium in 1992, served as an insuperable barrier to listening to the party on other issues. But as the Democrats begin to show that there really is a difference between being pro-choice and pro-abortion, and that they want to focus on reducing the number of abortions, the party will have crossed a threshold for these voters. They might get a broader hearing on issues such as health care and the war in Iraq."

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Read the whole article, written with his typical political acuity here. 

James Martin, SJ

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10 years 1 month ago
I am reluctant to get into a discussion about abortion. One of the big reasons I am reluctant to get into a discussion about abortion is that I have never been willing to adopt and raise an unwanted child. Obviously in the United States we are not doing a very good job for our children. Millions of our children live in poverty. I am well fed and well housed. This means I am complicit with both the poverty in my own country and in the world. I believe abortion is wrong. However, I also believe the poor, unemployed, homeless, undocumented immigrants, the uninsured, the under-educated, etc. etc. have a better chance with the Democratic Party. As a Chicano I am especially sensitive about what the Republicans have been unwilling to do for our undocumented immigrants. I am voting for Barak Obama and Joe Biden. Michael
10 years ago
Personally I don't have any exact explanations about anything. I think we need to be cautious about getting stuck in our dichotomies. They usually are not real. Also if we get too stuck in our dichotomies, we don't have the opportunity to move forward with better ideas and bigger horizons. Michael
10 years ago
Please explain to me what exactly is the difference between being pro-choice and pro-abortion in the context of America today with Roe v. Wade. To say that you are for decreasing, and not eliminating, legal abortions is not to be opposed to abortions. No matter how the Democrats wish to spin the issue, they will not come out against Roe v. Wade. Period.
10 years ago
I consider myself to be pro-life because I am actually interested in decreasing the number of abortions by dealing with the issues that contribute to them being performed as opposed to a law making them illegal. It has been estimated that around 40% of abortions are already performed illegally. I don't think either party has a game plan to deal with the true nature of the issue and why they are taking place. Unfortunately, abortion is more than just a law. It is a practice that has been ingrained into the fabric of our society. If Roe v. Wade is eliminated, it will simply push them underground if the root causes aren't dealt with, and I don't consider this spin either. Elimination of the law is not a magic cure all. Drugs are illegal. Look how well we have that under control.

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