Who is George Tooker?

The name may not be familiar to America readers, but Tooker is among the most important living American artists, according to America editorial director Karen Sue Smith, who reviews an exhibition of of his work here for America Connects.

"George Tooker: A Retrospective" will be at the National Academy Museum in New York through January 4 and then travels to Philadelphia and Columbus, Ohio. Tooker is perhaps best known for his Kafkaesque explorations of racism, alienation and isolation, like "Lunch," from 1964. Yet in the last 30 years his work has also explored themes of beauty, peace and community, a transformation that stems in part from his conversion to Catholicism in the 1970s.

Advertisement

To view a slideshow of Tooker’s work, click here.

And in case you missed it, last week Karen reviewed the un-missable exhibit on Marc Chagall’s biblical art now at MOBIA. Read her review here.

Tim Reidy

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement

The latest from america

Panel members Ivor Frank and Alexis Jay at a public hearing of the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (courtesy of the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse)
The new report finds evidence of appalling sexual and physical mistreatment of students as young as 7, as well as a culture of secrecy, at two abbey schools.
David StewartAugust 14, 2018
The Gospel calls on all of us to get past “analysis paralysis,” where direct action is always put off in favor of more research and discernment.
Mary M. McConnahaAugust 14, 2018
All sorts of emotions come up in prayer.
James Martin, S.J.August 13, 2018
In this April 18, 2018, file photo, Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts speaks at the legislature, in Lincoln, Neb. (Gwyneth Roberts/Lincoln Journal Star via AP, File)
Gov. Pete Ricketts helped finance a ballot drive to reinstate capital punishment after lawmakers overrode his veto in 2015.