Vlog VII: The Mass as Prayer

Father Jim Martin, associate editor and author of My Life with the Saints, reflects on how to make the Mass a more prayerful experience. A note from Father Jim: That quote from St. Augustine’s sermons, which I unsuccessfully tried to remember, is: ’If you receive worthily, you are what you have received.’ I’ve also heard it expressed as, "Become what you receive.’ Either way, it’s better than what I could pull up from my faulty theological memory!"

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See Father Jim’s other videos on prayer here.

Tim Reidy

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9 years ago
This was a very helpful and insightful video to watch. I like Masses that have a lot of pauses and silences. I don't like Masses that are too busy and noisy. I definitely like the readings to be done slowly. I am lucky. I go to Mass at a small Benedictine (Camaldolese Benedictine) monastery in Berkeley, California. I appreciate the liturgies we have. We even chant Lauds before the Mass starts. There is a core group of people who go to this monastery. Over the years we have become close friends. I have no problem with the fact that some people like a different type of Mass than I do.

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