Too Much Downton? Never.

Too much coverage of "Downton Abbey" in the media?  Never!  For our second-season roundup, we knew that there was only one writer for the job, our film reviewer John Anderson, who often writes for The New York Times and Variety.  My favorite apercu: "Perhaps the most remarkable thing about “Downton Abbey,” in terms of structure, is its violent compression of time and, occasionally, space. No moments are wasted in comings and goings; people speak of arriving and—instantly—have arrived. After Matthew and his footman, William, are wounded at the Battle of Amiens in 1918, they suddenly materialize at Downton as if they have just returned from a pub down the block."  Read the rest here. 

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Amy Ho-Ohn
6 years 7 months ago
Television eats your brain and turns you into a moron. Kill your television.
6 years 7 months ago
Amy, not all of them.   Actually I don't own a TV set since we went digital... I do miss the shows on PBS. They were the only ones I used to watch, and of course, dancing with the stars. 
Bill Collier
6 years 7 months ago
Very good high-brow soap opera that has sucked both my wife and me in, though a couple of the plot lines during the second season came dangerously close to jumping the shark. (Spoiler Alert: Hard to believe a British 1920's aristocrat would have so easily allowed his barely adult daughter to get married to the family's Irish chaffeur and then go off to Ireland together.) According to creator/writer Julian Fellowes, the third season is supposedly going to include "a Catholic theme" among others.   

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