Thank You Sister

Here's an innovative way to express your support of women religious, who are in the midst of an apostolic visitation from the Vatican.  What I like best about it is this: It is an entirely positive, loving and Christian way of sharing with the Vatican our gratitude for the contribution of women religious in our lives.  It is also firmly in line with the Second Vatican Council's document Lumen Gentium, which called upon the laity to express their opinions "on things which pertain to the good of the church."   "By reason of the knowledge, competence or pre-eminence which they have the laity are empowered--indeed sometimes obliged--to manifest their opinion on those things which pertain to the good of the Church."  (LG 37)  Here is part of the email we received today:

"Thank You Sister," is proud to announce the launch of an innovative web-based letter campaign in support of women religious. Letters from around the world written in support of women religious will be posted at www.thankyousister.com throughout the month of November. At the end of the month, the letters will be sent to Mother Mary Clare Millea, Cardinal Franc Rode, Cardinal Francis George and Pope Benedict XVI as well as leadership teams of communities of women religious in the United States.

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david power
8 years 1 month ago
Could we do the same for the Legion of Christ and the Society of St Pius?I can just see you jumping at the bit to do it.It would really be great to read an article here in America that strives to understand the need for a visitation.It seems that the editors and especially Fr Martin are capable of hearing only one side of this argument.  
Mary Ellen Carroll
8 years 1 month ago
I am very disappointed in the Vatican investigation of our American sisters.  My grandparents came here from Ireland in the 1910s and 20s.  They were poor and uneducated.  The sisters who taught my parents and their siblings helped that generation to move from the under classes to the middle class.  My siblings and I were also taught by sisters and thanks to them six of us went on to higher education and good jobs.  My parents taught us to respect the sisters hard work and devotion.  I have been taught by 5 different orders from grammar school through college.  The majority of them were great teachers, unselfish and inspiring.  I have worked with sisters through the work that I now do.  Most of them are older, have worked all their lives for a Church that does not value their contribution and disrespects their dedication.  From my vantage point, the sisters are closer to living out the Gospel than those who are investigating them. 
Tony Cardona
8 years 1 month ago
Although I do not share the accusations of bias in David Power's comment, I do agree and would like to see an article on the reasons for the Vatican's visit. While I strongly support our Sisters, I still do not understand the issues involving the recent apostolic visitation. It would be very informative to have an educated piece on the reasons for the visit, the objectives, and concerns. It would help me get a better idea of what the situation is and create an informed opinion on the visitation's merit.
Shannon McGinley
8 years 1 month ago
The reason for the apostolic visitation is because American ''Sisters'' no longer believe in the true presence of our Lord in the Eucharist.
They may help the poor and sick and needy, as well as teach everyone to love each other. But glory to God is the most important commandment.
Where are the habits?
Not to mention, I have never seen a religious sister under the age of sixty, unless she is with a traditional order. Regardless of this visitation, these ''ways'' are on their way out.
Thomas Rooney
8 years 1 month ago
Shannon, you paint with a very large brush: the visitation is underway because American Sisters don't believe in the Real Presence???
While it is certainly important to glorify God, the most imprtant commandment is to ''love God with all of your heart, mind, soul, and strength, and to love your neighbor as yourself.''  If these Sisters are treating their neighbors as Christ before us, how are they failing to glorify God?  Donning a habit, while a beautiful sign of the religious life, is not a requirement.
Pax,
Thomas
 
8 years 1 month ago
Are there others here  tired of right wingnuts posting on progressive religous sites. They have their own boring sites which usually charge to post. I would not even bother to 'donate' 5 cents to gain entry. 
Rose Hoover
8 years 1 month ago
Shannon, I don't know where you got the idea that we don't believe in the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist.  When I told Sister Elizabeth what you said, she was shocked and exclaimed, ''But we do believe!'' 
As for teaching people to love each other, remember that Jesus said, '''You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind.' This is the greatest and first commandment. And a second is like it: 'You shall love your neighbor as yourself'''(Matthew 22:37-39).  Isn't this glorifying God?
Joseph Farrell
8 years 1 month ago
The reason for the visitation is very simple.  While most sisters are
faithful servants of Christ and wonderful examples for the Church, there are
many who have wandered astray.  There are countless instances where
sisters take public stands against Church doctrine, and that simply cannot be
since they are visible representatives of the Church.  Additionally, most
of the orders are drying up in the new vocations department.  Convents are
being visited just as seminaries were several years ago.

 

As a seminarian, I have worked with many great sisters in the past few
years. These have been both "traditional" in habits and living in
community and "modern" living as individual witnesses to Christ's
mission.  The visitation can be a very positive thing.  While I'm a great
admirer of Father Martin and his books are among my favorite spiritual reading,
I do disagree with his consistent portrayal of the visitation in a negative
light.
david power
8 years 1 month ago
Two of my Aunts were Nuns and they were very happy to serve Jesus .I feel privileged to have had them in my life.They always loved the Pope and respected the life,this is important.They were in Chile and I think that the nuns there are very different to some of the Nuns I meet here.We must love the Church and love the Pope.God will bless us all if we are faithful to the blessed sacrament.

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