Prince Caspian

This is going to be unspeakably cool. Narnia fans will know that Prince Caspian is the second book of the Narnia series. It occurs chronologically after "The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe," but in terms of Narnia history is after "The Magician’s Nephew," which institutes Narnian history. It’s 1,300 years after the Pevensie children take the Narnia throne. Prince Caspian Trailer Happy viewing! I can’t wait.
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11 years 9 months ago
My family has enjoyed seeing the BBC version of the four Narnia books on dvd. My daughter still prefers the BBC Lion, Witch and the Wardrobe to the studio version. Not sure why--they are pretty close in quality until you get to the special effects. Speaking of Tolkien, it's a mystery why nobody is making a few of the First Age tales into movies. Beren & Luthien, The Children of Turin would make two great flicks for starters. I'd love to see the fight scene between Morgoth and Fingolfin, too.
11 years 9 months ago
:insert rediculously exciting nerddom here: Let's see, get my calendar out...nope, not doing anything on May 16th. Should be good to go! Hopefully it's better than the first, which was ok but not nearly as good as LOTR. Then again, I always preferred Tolkien to Lewis. Not that this should devolve into a "who's better" thread, but I always appreciated the great depth of Tolkien's universe much better than Lewis's.
11 years 9 months ago
What, no Magisterium?

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