Pope Meets with Abuse Victims

Today Pope Benedict met with "five or six" victims of sexual abuse, from the Boston area. The emotional meeting took place in the office of the Vatican nuncio to the U.S., in Washington, D.C. For many Catholics, this represents a significant step forward in the healing of the church. It is not a panacea, but a very positive, and pastoral, response from the pope. Read more of my commentary here:Pope Meets with Abuse Victims And here is a link to The Anchoress, who has had a searing personal experience with abuse, and therefore strong opinions on the matter: The Anchoress James Martin, SJ
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9 years 7 months ago
Watching three of the victims on CNN was most moving and each seemed to appreciate the authenticity of the Pope's caring -- a huge gift towards healing. As John Allen said, "unprecedented" and a wonderful gesture that inspires us all. McDaid's challenge to the him that "there is huge cancer in the body of the church" (or words to that effect) is directed, I believe, at not just abusers, but the attitudes of many bishops and their diocesan attorneys. Although the reforms-- and costs! -- have created a sea change of attitude, it seems as though Benedict will quietly let this generation of bishops retire. Who will be in the next given the pool is yet questionable. I would love to think the Pope might present to Cardinal Law the list of 1000 victims given to him by the Boston Cardinal O'Malley and quietly look him in the eyes for five minutes as they also look at the names -- and then suggest that he know what he might do to help effect healing and that he will await his resignation. That would be unprecendented.

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