Pope Francis 'Likes' Vatican II

During the homily of yesterday's mass dedicated to Benedict XVI 16th(who turned 86), Pope Francis offered a happily unnuanced endorsement of the ambitions of Vatican II, noted efforts to "turn the clock back" and suggested the church needed to do more to complete "everything the Holy Spirit was asking us to do during the Council."

His homily considered the theme of the Holy Spirit and our resistance to it. According to Vatican Radio, Pope Francis said, “The Holy Spirit upsets us because it moves us, it makes us walk, it pushes the Church forward.” He said that we wish “to calm down the Holy Spirit, we want to tame it and this is wrong...that’s because the Holy Spirit is the strength of God, it’s what gives us the strength to go forward” but many find this upsetting and prefer the comfort of the familiar.

Advertisement

He continued, “Everybody seems happy about the presence of the Holy Spirit but it’s not really the case and there is still that temptation to resist it.” The Pope said one example of this resistance was the Second Vatican council which he called “a beautiful work of the Holy Spirit.” But 50 years later, “have we done everything the Holy Spirit was asking us to do during the Council,” he asked. The answer is “No,” said Pope Francis. “We celebrate this anniversary, we put up a monument but we don’t want it to upset us. We don’t want to change and what’s more there are those who wish to turn the clock back.” This, he went on, “is called stubbornness and wanting to tame the Holy Spirit.”

The Pope said the same thing happens in our personal life. “The Spirit pushes us to take a more evangelical path but we resist this.” He concluded his homily by urging those present not to resist the pull of the Holy Spirit. “Submit to the Holy Spirit,” he said, “which comes from within us and makes go forward along the path of holiness.”

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
Bill Mazzella
5 years 4 months ago
Fitting that Francis is pointing to the power of the Holy Spirit. Because Francis has a spirit about him that is electrifying. It is the spirit which gives life as Jesus says. Unfortunately an Empire church has historically curbed the spirit and juridicized the church. Someone on fire with the spirit is often seen as a danger as the lukewarm status quo is preferred. Solid historians note that the fourth century brought mediocrity into the church. With Augustine as a principal culprit. A church which has triumphed Canon law over the spirit needs a Francis to rejuvenate it. Francis seems serious about bringing the ardor of the spirit back into the faith.
Chris NUNEZ
5 years 4 months ago
That's great, but he hasn't logged in and 'liked' the Facebook page for the 'secondvaticancouncil' -- hope he does very soon! We're waiting.
Robert and Susan Bulger
5 years 4 months ago
During Sunday's homily, Pope Francis I warned the whole Church about resisting the Holy Spirit, and linked that to both the temptation in every believer to be lukewarm, but also the temptation of some to turn back the clock on Vatican II. Let the Easter Bells ring. Alleluia. Amen.
Robert Killoren
5 years 3 months ago
Aggiornamento!

Advertisement

The latest from america

I have found myself for the first time truly afraid of what it means to ask and to allow my children to be part of the church.
Kerry WeberAugust 15, 2018
Cardinal William H. Keeler in May 2009. (CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz) 
A Pennsylvania report accuses Keeler of covering up sexual abuse allegations while serving as bishop of Harrisburg.
Associated PressAugust 15, 2018
With her appeal to emotion, Gadsby reminds audiences to see the vulnerable, resilient human being behind the humiliated stand-up comic.
Allyson EscobarAugust 15, 2018
Boston Cardinal Sean P. O'Malley and Deacon Bernie Nojadera, executive director of the U.S. bishops' Secretariat for Child and Youth Protection, are pictured during the 2017 Catholic convocation in Orlando, Fla.  (CNS photo/Bob Roller)
“Our first job is to listen, to be empathetic,” said Deacon Bernie Nojadera, the executive director of the U.S. bishops’ Secretariat for the Protection of Children and Young People.