Palm Sunday demonstration in Jerusalem

We mentioned this protest in the April 12 Signs of the Times. A group of Palestinian Christians and supporters march after Palm Sunday Mass from the Church of Nativity to Jerusalem and caught Israeli border police by surprise. I think everybody was surprised how far they got past the checkpoint before the Israeli security took control of the demonstration. The Palestinian Christians were advocating for freedom of movement and religion. Here's what it looked like at street level:

 

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Kevin Clarke

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Beth Cioffoletti
8 years 5 months ago
It looks like a very nonviolent protest/action to me.  The Palestinians had no weapons and displayed no violence or resistence when they were forcefully dealt with by the Israelis.
 
There was an article in the NY Times last week about Palestinians who were planting trees on land that is being used for Israeli settlements - a nonviolent way of laying claim to the land.  If there is ever a place that violence will never solve anything, it is in this Holy Land.  And if there is ever a place where Nonviolence could possilby rise from the suffering to bring peace, it is here.
 
Recently someone told me that both the Jews and the Palestinians were decended from the same tribe - the Semites.  So that when we speak of anti-Semitism, which most people think means racism against Jews, it also includes the Palestinians.

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