NPR Watch

This morning’s "Morning Edition" had a segment on writer Elizabeth McCracken and her new book about her first child who died in utero. It is the kind of story that will make pro-choice advocates re-think their position and is a perfect example of how we in the pro-life community can change the culture to better reflect the reality of pre-natal human life.

And, on today’s "Tell Me More" with Michel Martin, your humble political blogger was a guest discussing the leading religious stories of 2008. The show airs at different times in different markets, so check your local NPR listings. You can also listen when they post the webcast at noon EST by clicking here

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Michael Sean Winters

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8 years 9 months ago
That segment on "Morning Edition: was quite moving and it does show a framework or ethic of caring and value that can inform the discussion in other than deontological ways. Yet the rhetoric that yet comes forth --as Kavanaugh notes-- from "abortion absolutists" can spoil the value of such meaningful dialogue. Is anyone writing about "delayed hominization" in a scientifically and theologically consistent manner. I still like that Thomistic notion albeit with erroneus embryology!) that we learned in seminary from speculations of Jesuit Joseph Donceel's "Philosophical Anthropology" many years ago.

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