NPR on the Apostolic Visitation

 

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Hard on the heels of the article in The New York Times about the Apostolic Visitation of women's religious orders in the United States, and the Leadership Conference of Women Religious, is today's NPR's "On Point" show, which gathers a diverse set of guests.  Here is the roundup from NPR's website:

Laurie Goodstein, national religion correspondent for The New York Times. She’s covered American Catholic life for more than a decade. Her recent article, “U.S. Nuns Facing Vatican Scrutiny,” has stirred up some debate.

From Berkeley, Calif., Sister Sandra Schneiders, professor emerita of New Testament studies and spirituality at The Jesuit Theology School at Berkeley. She is a member of Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, an order in Monroe, Michigan. She has expressed concern publicly over the Vatican’s inquiry into American nuns, but makes clear that she’s speaking for herself, not her order or theology school.

From Pittsburgh, Sister Mary Traupman, a practicing attorney a member of Sisters of Divine Providence, an order in Allison Park, Pennsylvania. In her legal work she helps senior citizens with issues from guardianship to social security. She has also worked as a teacher and as a health care administrator.

And from Gallup, New Mexico, Mother Mary Quentin Sheridan, Superior General of The Religious Sisters of Mercy of Alma, Michigan. She is also a founder and current president of the Council of Major Superiors of Women Religious, which supports more traditional roles for women in Catholic religious orders.

It's a fascinating discussion that you can listen to here.  The last four or five minutes in particular are quite lively: Mother Mary and Sister Sandra describe two views of religious life in the post-Vatican II church. 

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8 years 7 months ago
I normally like Tom Ashbrook... but, man, he sounded so desperate to get someone to complain about opression, conspiracies and "the heirarchy" (he sounded so excited when one caller mentioned an opressive male heirarchy) that he came across as a muckraker. I liked this, though. Goes to show that you can never really tell from a news article where anyone stands.

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