NPR on the Apostolic Visitation

 

Advertisement

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hard on the heels of the article in The New York Times about the Apostolic Visitation of women's religious orders in the United States, and the Leadership Conference of Women Religious, is today's NPR's "On Point" show, which gathers a diverse set of guests.  Here is the roundup from NPR's website:

Laurie Goodstein, national religion correspondent for The New York Times. She’s covered American Catholic life for more than a decade. Her recent article, “U.S. Nuns Facing Vatican Scrutiny,” has stirred up some debate.

From Berkeley, Calif., Sister Sandra Schneiders, professor emerita of New Testament studies and spirituality at The Jesuit Theology School at Berkeley. She is a member of Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, an order in Monroe, Michigan. She has expressed concern publicly over the Vatican’s inquiry into American nuns, but makes clear that she’s speaking for herself, not her order or theology school.

From Pittsburgh, Sister Mary Traupman, a practicing attorney a member of Sisters of Divine Providence, an order in Allison Park, Pennsylvania. In her legal work she helps senior citizens with issues from guardianship to social security. She has also worked as a teacher and as a health care administrator.

And from Gallup, New Mexico, Mother Mary Quentin Sheridan, Superior General of The Religious Sisters of Mercy of Alma, Michigan. She is also a founder and current president of the Council of Major Superiors of Women Religious, which supports more traditional roles for women in Catholic religious orders.

It's a fascinating discussion that you can listen to here.  The last four or five minutes in particular are quite lively: Mother Mary and Sister Sandra describe two views of religious life in the post-Vatican II church. 

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
8 years 10 months ago
I normally like Tom Ashbrook... but, man, he sounded so desperate to get someone to complain about opression, conspiracies and "the heirarchy" (he sounded so excited when one caller mentioned an opressive male heirarchy) that he came across as a muckraker. I liked this, though. Goes to show that you can never really tell from a news article where anyone stands.

Advertisement

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

The leaders sent a letter to President Donald Trump, administration officials and members of Congress.
Altar servers lead a Palm Sunday procession March 25 in Youtong, in China's Hebei province. (CNS photo/Damir Sagolj, Reuters)
The pope appeared to be alluding to the fact that since February there has been a crackdown by the Chinese authorities on religion in the mainland.
Gerard O’ConnellMay 23, 2018
Chilean clerical sex abuse survivors Juan Carlos Cruz, James Hamilton and Jose Andres Murillo in Rome, May 2. The three met Pope Francis individually at the Vatican April 27-29. The Vatican announced on May 22 that a second group of abuse victims will visit the pope in June (CNS photo/Paul Haring).
The encounters will take place from June 1-3 at Santa Marta, the Vatican guesthouse where Francis lives.
Gerard O’ConnellMay 22, 2018
Pope Francis talks with Cardinal Sean P. O'Malley of Boston, president of the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors, as they arrive for a meeting in the synod hall at the Vatican in this Feb. 13, 2015, file photo. (CNS photo/Paul Haring) 
Righteous call-outs should be patterned after Cardinal O’Malley’s rebuke of Pope Francis on sex abuse.
Simcha FisherMay 22, 2018