Nigeria's Boko Haram in New Attack

A woman leaves Kawuri, Nigeria, with her family and belongings after suspected Islamist Boko Haram insurgents killed 85 people in January.

Just two days ago they killed killed 59 pupils at a boarding school in Yobe state. Why can't these terrorists be stopped?...

From Voice of America:

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YOLA, NIGERIA —Gunmen from Islamist sect Boko Haram shot dead at least 12 people during a four-hour siege on villages in northeast Nigeria overnight, two days after a deadly attack on a school, witnesses said on Thursday.

Boko Haram, whose fight for an Islamic state in northern Nigeria has killed thousands and made them the biggest threat to security in Africa's top oil producer, is increasingly preying on the civilian population.

Gunmen riding in 13 pick-up trucks sped into Kirchinga village in Adamawa state in the evening, burning churches and houses and shooting sporadically at fleeing villagers, residents said.

The insurgents chased residents into neighboring Shuwa village, where they torched the house of a local bishop, a theological school and a police station.

The owner of a bakery, Martha Yakubu, said she counted 12 dead bodies, including two of her workers. Banks, small schools and dozens of houses were attacked.

Read the rest here.

 
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