My Bad

Reader, Kevin, has pointed out that on NPR this morning, Steve Inskeep did not use the word "irony" but the word "awkward" in describing the President's accepting the Nobel Peace Prize one week after announcing an increase in troops for Afghanistan. I went back and listened again and Kevin is absolutely right: Mr. Inskeep used the word "awkward" not "ironic." I apologize for the error although I do not think it materially alters the argument I was making: There is nothing awkward about the President receiving the prize after announcing a strategy to contain and combat some of the leading disturbers of peace on the planet. Still, I regret the error and can only explain my mistake by noting that I had not had my second cup of coffee when I was in the car this morning listening to NPR. I thank Kevin for pointing it out.

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david power
8 years 3 months ago
You remain one of the few reasons to read America.A breath of fresh air not all cramped up on itself and in touch with more than yourself.I had high hopes for America about six months ago but now see it in a far less intellectual and more ideological light.About Obama you are one of the few who understands that peace needs more than pacifism.Those who disagree would speak German and not through any sense of Papalism.Stay well clear from Merton and any fashion from the past and you will do just fine!You remain a challenge and a joy to read.You lack about ten articles in praise of Dubya to round you off.
8 years 3 months ago
Obama is wrong and undeserving of a Noble Prize...he promotes the slaughter of thousands at home via promotion of abortion and thousands abroad by the promotion of unjust occupation.
Also, I wonder it the America magazine of yore supported the American policies in Vietnam?
This war is not about "making the world safer," it is about American imperialism and progressive notions regarding the "spread of democracy and freedom" at any cost.
What cost?  How about supporting a corrupt regime that is regarded as a mence in the territory it controls due to it's incompetent and brutal armed forces.  There is virtually no child rape in areas controlled by the taliban; however, it is WIDE SPREAD in the areas controlled by the American financed/trained Afgan forces.
Bottom line, this is an unjust occupation and that is how the Afgans (like the Vietnamese before them) correctly view or presence.
The road to hell is paved with progressive, militaristic foreign policy...
Kevin Jam
8 years 3 months ago
It certainly happens, Mr. Winters; no harm done. Your post is still very thought-provoking and valuable to this discussion. Thank you for your thoughts and for your integrity.


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