From Mirada Global: A Strange Beauty

Here our latest offering from Mirada Global, a reflection on the beauty of scientific equations from Gabriel Ferraro:

This symmetry of the equations expresses something very deep about the nature of electricity and magnetism. In a way, each one of these phenomenon is the consequence of the other. One could say they express something, a fundamental property of matter which manifests itself in very different ways, yet symmetrical. That is also why we say that equations are beautiful. Simplicity and symmetry: two attributes that make what we call beauty.

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Read "A Strange Beauty"

You can read it in Spanish here.

Tim Reidy

 

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Stanley Kopacz
7 years 12 months ago
Lovely to see someone talk about the four Maxwell's equations.  Most people never hear of them but, with a few little math tricks, all those predictions, like the wave nature of light and the speed of light, pop out of them.  They ARE beautiful in their symmetry.  There have been t-shirts with the message,

"And God said:

(Maxwell's Equations here)

and there was light."
Stanley Kopacz
7 years 12 months ago
The equations require the use of vector analysis symbols which may not be available in the fonts usually used.  Generally, one can use a program like Mathcad to set up the equation and then make a jpeg of it and insert it. 

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