Mensaje on Chile's Indigenous People

Chile's political dynamics were largely unknown to the American public prior to this week's dramatic rescue of 33 miners. And now we generally only hear about how the episode will affect President Sebasitian Pinera's chances for reelection.

The Jesuit-edited Mensaje magazine is a valuable source of commentary on Chilean politics and now thanks to Mirada Global, select articles are available in English. Here is a look at relations between Chile and its indigienous population, the Mapuche people:

Advertisement

The difficulties that Chilean society and the state have in accepting the indigenous peoples that inhabit the country and do them justice have been made obvious in this Bicentennial.

As long as the country does not recognize its ethnical and cultural diversity, as have done other countries in the region and the world, while they aren’t treated fairly and respectfully, as they deserve, while their right to participate and to their autonomy are not recognized, as well as the rights they have over their lands and territories, which is today accepted by international and compared law, this open wound which causes the country so much pain, will continue to be there. Let’s hope it isn’t so.

The article is also available in Spanish.

Tim Reidy

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement

The latest from america

I have found myself for the first time truly afraid of what it means to ask and to allow my children to be part of the church.
Kerry WeberAugust 15, 2018
Cardinal William H. Keeler in May 2009. (CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz) 
A Pennsylvania report accuses Keeler of covering up sexual abuse allegations while serving as bishop of Harrisburg.
Associated PressAugust 15, 2018
With her appeal to emotion, Gadsby reminds audiences to see the vulnerable, resilient human being behind the humiliated stand-up comic.
Allyson EscobarAugust 15, 2018
Boston Cardinal Sean P. O'Malley and Deacon Bernie Nojadera, executive director of the U.S. bishops' Secretariat for Child and Youth Protection, are pictured during the 2017 Catholic convocation in Orlando, Fla.  (CNS photo/Bob Roller)
“Our first job is to listen, to be empathetic,” said Deacon Bernie Nojadera, the executive director of the U.S. bishops’ Secretariat for the Protection of Children and Young People.