Me? How Can I Reduce Income Disparities?

Man walks past a vacant home in Detroit neighborhood (CNS photo)

Before I entered the Jesuits in 1988, I worked for six years at General Electric in their finance department. Before that, I studied at the Wharton School of Business, where I majored in finance, which also meant taking courses in accounting, management, securities, bonds and real estate. 

Why am I telling you this? Not to brag, but to establish a bit of bona fides when it come to talking about the economy, about business and about work on this Labor Day. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, building on Catholic social teaching, which builds on the Gospels, has called us to work for a more just world, particularly in terms of income inequality. 

But the average person, who is neither an economist, nor the head of the World Bank, nor president of the United States, might ask themselves: How can I help?

Here are few easy steps....

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