The Jesuit Post Launches

Today is the official launch of "The Jesuit Post," a cool new website founded and run by young Jesuits (or, more accurately, Jesuits in formation) that hopes to cover "Jesus, politics, and pop-culture...the Catholic Church, sports, and Socrates." More Jesus than Socrates of course, but you get the idea.  "It’s about making the case for God (better: letting God make the case for Himself) in our secular age," says editor-in-chief Patrick Gilger, SJ.  (Also on staff are Jim Keane, S.J., former associate editor at America, Sam Sawyer, SJ and Eric Sundrup, SJ.)  The site looks great; it's easy to navigate and the content is tops.  Already up are pieces covering the Mass, healthcare reform, yoga, Tim Tebow (in an article entitled "I Can't Stand Tim Tebow but He Makes me a Better Person) and Flannery O'Connor.  (Full disclosure: I'm a "special correspondent," and am proud to be one.)  Check it out today...World Communications Day, after all and the Feast of St. Francis de Sales, patron of Catholic writers. AMDG!

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david power
7 years 1 month ago

Hope Nietzsche gets an article or two as well,good luck to you all.
7 years ago
I've visited it twice.  Quite interesting!.  Thanks for sharing.

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