Jadot vs. Laghi

Both Archbishop Jean Jadot and Cardinal Pio Laghi died this month. Jadot served as an apostolic delegate to the United States under Paul VI, and Laghi was nuncio under John Paul II. In 1990, Father Tom Reese offered this helpful comparison of the two men and the legacy of the bishops that were appointed during their tenures.

Read "The Laghi Legacy."

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Tim Reidy

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9 years 10 months ago
Reese's survey fails to take account of theological views of the bishops, a key issue. He does note the greater unpopularity among priests of appointments made during Laghi's tenure. Many of Reese's points about background seem, frankly, beside the point. See NCR's long article about Jadot's legacy that makes clear the differences between Jadot and Laghi. See http://ncronline3.org/drupal/?q=node/3144#comment-27681 Jadot himself felt the impact keenly when Laghi was made cardinal. It was like a slap in the face, Jadot told his close friend, and much less about just appointing a cardinal. The friend is writing a book that should add immeasurably to the record. The full story is yet to be told, but the traditional understandings about the differences look to be right on the mark.

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