Harry Forbes on "Eat Pray Love"

Maureen O'Connell in a post below has already registered her alarm at the commodification of spiritual longings in the marketing of the new movie "Eat Pray Love."  She also predicted that the movie may not simply be a disappointment, but actually dangerous.  Now, in his review, Harry Forbes, one of our film critics, looks at the movie itself.   And it is, in short, a disappointment. 

The spiritual aspects of the story are negligible for all the high-minded talk, though there’s a nice scene near the beginning where the distraught Gilbert tearfully calls on God to help her. “I’m a big fan of your work,” she begins awkwardly before morphing into a more traditional entreaty.

The book clearly resonates with millions of readers, and there’s no reason to think the film won’t do likewise. For everyone else, it can be enjoyed as a lavish travelogue. And it will most certainly set the taste buds watering for one of those delectably arranged plates of pasta. Others may even leave their local cinema with a hankering to clear their heads with an act of quiet meditation.

Ultimately, Gilbert learns the value of balance in one’s life (summarized glibly at one point as “not loving anyone more than you love yourself”), but you may be left pondering why she had to leave her husband and travel clear around the world to figure that out.


Read the rest of Harry Forbes review here.

Advertisement
Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement

The latest from america

Brotherhood must not be used as a cloak for privilege and secrecy.
Matthew Wooters, S.J. September 24, 2018
Napoleon’s consolidation of power in France in 1801 involved the recognition of the pope as the “ordinary and immediate pastor” of the universal church—a key component in the impending agreement between the Vatican and China.
Jeffrey von ArxSeptember 24, 2018
"Young Latinos are engaged. They are open to giving of themselves,” Archbishop José Gomez said. “We need to be more conscious of ministries for young Catholics.”
J.D. Long-GarcíaSeptember 24, 2018
 A young woman holds the Latvian flag as Pope Francis celebrates Mass Sept. 24 at the Shrine of the Mother of God in Aglona, Latvia. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)
It was an important message for the 2.2 million people of Latvia, where today 37 percent of the population are Russian.
Gerard O’ConnellSeptember 24, 2018