Guy Consolmagno, S.J. on Colbert

One of the guests on "The Colbert Report" tonight will be Jesuit Brother Guy Consolmagno, S.J., Ph.D., a planetary scientist and expert on meteorites (and full disclosure: friend), who works at the Vatican Observatory in Rome and Tucson.  Guy, who has umpteen degrees from places like M.I.T., is also author of numerous books on the intersection of science and faith, including Brother Astronomer and God's Mechanics, and is a regular contributor to the London Tablet and even to America, as with his wonderful article, "Talking to Techies."  Don't miss him!

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Joe Garcia
8 years 10 months ago
I hereby offer an unsolicited testimonial on behalf of Br. Guy's first book. A terrific, fun, illuminating read.
Besides, anything which sheds light on the Jesuit Brothers is a welcome sight.
AMDG,
8 years 10 months ago
Me too.  I have his book, "Brother Astronomer",  which is really good .... meteorite hunting in Antarctica  :)  There's an interesting video interview with him from Grace Cathedral titled "Brother Guy Consolmagno: God's Mechanics" that can be found here ....
 
http://fora.tv/2008/03/02/Brother_Guy_Consolmagno_God_s_Mechanics
 

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