Greg Boyle on NPR's Fresh Air

Greg Boyle, S.J., founder of Homeboy Industries, and author of Tattoos on the Heart (which we reviewed here in our piece "Hope for Homies"), was interviewed on May 20 on NPR's "Fresh Air with Terry Gross." (Back in April, he was also a guest on the America podcast.) As John Coleman, S.J., reported in "In All Things" a few weeks back, Homeboy Industries is facing serious financial problems, and has laid off "the bulk of our staff," as its website reported recently.  Here Greg talks with Terry Gross about Homeboy, gang ministry, the Jesuits and hope in general.  At one point Terry Gross asks him why he became a Jesuit.  "What made you feel called in the first place?"

"I liked the Jesuits.  They taught me...and they were hilarious and joyful, and nobody funnier on the planet earth than the Jesuits I knew.  And they were getting arrested protesting the Vietnam War.  I loved both those things.  And you put that together and I thought, boy, there's I wanted to with my life.  I want to be prophetic and take stands and stand with those on the margins, and I want to laugh as much as I can...."

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You can hear the interview here.  And you can help Homeboy Industries here.  As Greg notes, Angelenos donated money to save the famous Hollywood sign and an alligator named Reggie.  How about Homeboy?

James Martin, SJ

 

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
Beth Cioffoletti
8 years 2 months ago
I love this book.  I have just started it (on a tip from America), and wanted to wait until I got further along before commenting.  Every night I read just a little bit more, and it is beginning to feel like a poem or song to me.  Of glory.  Could it be that life, in all of its messiness, reallly is suffused with love?  Can I dare to enter more deeply into these marginal areas of life?
 
Thank you, G, for introducing me to your homies.  What a treasure you have uncovered. 

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