Fellay: Williamson Prohibited to Speak

This just in from John Allen at NCR.   Bishop Fellay of the Society of St. Pius X has released this statement in response to the controversy over Bishop Williamson’s recent remarks:

’We have become aware of an interview released by Bishop Richard Williamson, a member of our Fraternity of St. Pius X, to Swedish television. In this interview, he expressed himself on historical questions, and in particular on the question of the genocide against the Jews carried out by the Nazis.

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It’s clear that a Catholic bishop cannot speak with ecclesiastical authority except on questions that regard faith and morals. Our Fraternity does not claim any authority on other matters. Its mission is the propagation and restoration of authentic Catholic doctrine, expressed in the dogmas of the faith. It’s for this reason that we are known, accepted and respected in the entire world.

It’s with great sadness that we recognize the extent to which the violation of this mandate has done damage to our mission. The affirmations of Bishop Williamson do not reflect in any sense the position of our Fraternity. For this reason I have prohibited him, pending any new orders, from taking any public positions on political or historical questions.

We ask the forgiveness of the Supreme Pontiff, and of all people of good will, for the dramatic consequences of this act. Because we recognize how ill-advised these declarations were, we can only look with sadness at the way in which they have directly struck our Fraternity, discrediting its mission.

This is something we cannot accept, and we declare that we will continue to preach Catholic doctrine and to administer the sacraments of grace of Our Lord Jesus Christ.

Menzingen, January 27, 2009’ --NCR

James Martin, SJ

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9 years 2 months ago
'We ask the forgiveness of the Supreme Pontiff, and of all people of good will, for the dramatic consequences of this act.' I would have believed this statement were much more genuine if Fellay had also specifically asked for forgiveness from Jews for another sad chapter of anti-Semitism, a book that should have long ago been closed.

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