Diocese of Bridgeport Issues Statement on Newtown Shooting

Statement of Msgr. Jerald A. Doyle,
Administrator, Diocese of Bridgeport
Newtown School Shootings

On behalf of the Diocese of Bridgeport, we offer our prayers and our collective sense of grief, shock and loss after the tragic school shootings in Newtown. Msgr. Robert Weiss, Pastor of St. Rose of Lima Parish in Newtown, and the parish priests were on the scene ministering to children and families immediately after the shootings. Other priests and chaplains have since joined them in ministering to the families at the school, hospitals and other settings. Representatives from Catholic Charities counseling services are also working with families and will continue to do so in the coming days and weeks. The Catholic Charities team will be available to support teachers and students in area Catholic schools next week. We are all deeply saddened and shocked by this unthinkable tragedy, and our hearts go out to the entire Newtown community. Catholics throughout the Diocese are urged to join us in prayer for the victims and their families.

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ed gleason
5 years 10 months ago

Msgr.Weiss did well on interviews and with arranging a vigil on a short notice. Earlier it was reported that he wanted an ecumenical service at A High School but that seems not to have been arranged on time.

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