Detailed Comments Policy

We have just posted a more detailed explanation of our comments policy. If you have any questions about it, please feel free to contact me:

America welcomes thoughtful, respectful and well-reasoned comments from all of our readers. Our aim is to promote a civil and charitable discourse about topics of the day. To that end, we have a few rules:

1. Introduce yourself. Sign your full first and last name to all comments.
2. Be brief. Limit your comments to 300 words.
3. Keep on topic. Squarely address the subject raised in the blog post or article. Do not use the blog to tout favorite issues or causes.
4. Be charitable. Abstain from ad hominem attacks on our bloggers and your fellow contributors. Be charitable even about those public figures with whom you may disagree.
5. Use your own words. Refrain from copying and pasting passages from secondary sources. A link, or brief citation, will suffice.
6. Choose your spots. Resist the urge to comment on every post, or respond to every poster. Let other readers have their say.

Comments that do not follow these guidelines may be removed at the editors’ discretion. America also reserves the right to edit posts for length or clarity.

Questions can be directed to online editor Tim Reidy at webeditor@americamagazine.org. All communications regarding America’s editorial policy will be conducted by email, not in our comments boxes.

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Tim Reidy

 

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
Gabriel McAuliffe
8 years 6 months ago
Hurray!  Hurray!  Hurray!
Vince Killoran
8 years 6 months ago
Thank you!! These are entirely appropriate guidelines-they will improve greatly the exchanges).

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