James Martin, S.J.January 24, 2010

Who knew?

Our managing editor, Robert Collins, SJ, also directs an adult-initiation program at a nearby (Paulist!) parish, St. Paul the Apostle.  So he's always on the lookout for good catechetical material.  The other day he came upon this truly amazing resource on the USCCB website: daily video reflections on Scripture.  Perhaps it's been around for a while, but I hadn't heard of it.  And to my mind, that's an amazing resource for priests, deacons, and especially the lay faithful, who may not be able to get to Mass every day, or even delve into a Scripture commentary on a daily basis.  Anyway, in addition to the other, many, terrific resources on the USCCB's site, are these wonderful reflections. 

Check it out here. 

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Fran Rossi Szpylczyn
11 years 10 months ago
Who knew, is right! Wow. I use the USCCB readings page all the time, I have it set as a tabbed page when I open my browser at work. Suddenly, the allegedly media and internet savvy one stares sheepishly down at her shoes... I was just... reading. Occasionally listening to the audio readings.
 
I never really paid attention to the video element. Well- I will now! Thanks Fr. Jim!

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