Congratulations--Pontifical Biblical Institute

CONGRATULATIONS! 100 Years Old.       

“The Pontifical Biblical Institute (P.B.I.) is a university-level institution of the Holy See. It was established by Pope Pius X with the Apostolic Letter Vinea electa of May 7, 1909, in order to be "a center of higher studies for Sacred Scripture in the city of Rome and of all related studies according to the spirit of the Catholic Church". From its foundation the Institute was entrusted to the Society of Jesus, and Father L. Fonck was the one who served as organizer and first rector….

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Being an Institute of the Holy See, the P.B.I. has a pronounced international character; at the present time its students come from approximately sixty nations.”

This  is an excerpt from the website of the Institute (http://www.biblico.it), which provides   much information on the illustrious history, significant  publications,  and distinguished faculty and alumni of the Institute.           

As America magazine just celebrated our own 100th Anniversary, we extend a hand of congratulations to our one month younger Institute, so well known to Scripture scholars and indeed all theologians. Ad multos annos!

Peter Schineller, S.J.

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