Archbishop Wuerl: "We rejoice"

From the Archdiocese of Washington

Washington Archbishop Donald W. Wuerl called upon the faithful of the archdiocese to pray for President-elect Obama and all of the newly elected as they take on their new responsibilities: 


“We offer our prayers today for our nation and for our newly elected leaders, including President-elect Obama, as they take on their new responsibilities. We recognize that this election of the first African-American president is an historic moment in our nation’s history and we rejoice with the rest of our nation in the significance of this time. May our nation’s new leaders be guided in their decisions with wisdom and compassion and at the heart of all of their decisions may there be a deep respect for and commitment to the sanctity and dignity of all human life and support for the most vulnerable among us.”

James Martin, SJ

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9 years 4 months ago
Congratulations to Obama.He is a fine and intelligent man and may be what the world needs right now.Everybody should hope that his term is successful and that his decisions are good ones.But.Why did James Martin choose those two words from the statement of Archbishop Wuerl to act as headline?.Simply we rejoice!No word of caution.No thought for those with no direct say in the election .Those who depend on us to speak up for them.No ,not a word.They (the unborn) are what Mother Teresa called the "little ones" and are voiceless.So those on the margins feel they now have a voice and I hope it is so.Archbishop Wuerl allowed himself a lot more room for reflection than simply "We Rejoice".He spoke of those who most certainly have no friend in the new White House or perhaps in the offices of America.The "little ones" who have never been a cause celebre.Who have nobody but "right wing lunatics" to fight their corner.God Bless Obama and God Bless America,but I feel that blessing will be slow in coming if they both continue to ignore the cry of the least of His brothers.
9 years 4 months ago
David Power said it so well. There is no need to say anything more.


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