An Apology to the Reader

My bad, my very bad.

I am informed by email from my friend and erstwhile ideological disputant, Rick Garnett, of the blog "Mirror of Justice" that I used a term in yesterday’s post that is considered vulgar abroad. Having now found out its meaning, I do not wish to repeat it even once. I had used the term to suggest what I believed was the diminutiveness of the gripes coming from the protesters who marched on Washington last Saturday. I had thought that it was in this sense that the word was being used by several commentators on television. I apologize to our readers.

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8 years 8 months ago
I just read each of the comments under "Racism Revisited."  I'm pleased to see that your post struck a few nerves.  
Speaking of vulgarity, there is ample video and photographic evidence of blatant racism, mostly but not exclusively, in the form of posters and T-shirts being proudly waved and worn by rally attendees this past weekend and by townhall attendees this past summer.  They waved the posters and wore the T-shirts and posed for cameras knowing that the world would see and react to their intentionally vulgar racist messages.  
Racist vulgarity always did/does look better under a sheet.
 
8 years 8 months ago
It's vulgar here at home, too. I have been dismayed to hear commentators mainstreaming that phrase in political discussions. But they seem to get quite a juvenile thrill from it.
8 years 8 months ago
How about apologizing about calling people racist?  A severe lack of charity in reflecting on the motives of others. Though I guess you are in the same boat with Jimmy Carter who just can't find any other possible reason why so many are adverse to the policies of the Obama administration.
Racism is a great evil and you better be armed with facts more than crowd size and the fact that the President had a African father before you accuse people you don't even know of it.
Pullng the race card is like the boy who cried wolf and when actual acts of the evil of racism are commited the voice against it is diminished by those who through around the term.
8 years 8 months ago
That's a good point, Jeffrey. The term ''racist'' has been tossed around so carelessly that it's become almost meaningless. The people who are making these accusations may be scoring short-term political points, but the long-term damage to their credibility is likely to be significant.

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