Colbert & Martin

You probably know Father James Martin as Editor at Large of America, but you may not know that he also serves as The Official Chaplain of the satircal news show The Colbert Report. Mr. Colbert is known for his conservative, blowhard on-screen persona, and is a devout Catholic both on and off the air. In the Feb. 3 issue, Patrick R. Manning writes that teachers of the faith could learn a thing or two about evangelization from the charasmatic host, who embodies St. Augustine's formula for effective catechesis: delight, instruct, persuade.

Below are a few clips from Fr. Martin's interviews on the show. You can watch more of his appearances here

Advertisement
Fr. Jim Martin schools Mr. Colbert on just where Pope Francis is getting all this stuff about loving and serving the poor.

 

After America's groundbreaking interview with Pope Francis, Mr. Colbert worries the merciful pontiff won't enforce the rules of the faith. 

 

Following the announcement of the papal resignation in February 2013, Fr. Martin explains the significance of Pope Benedict XVI's historic decision. 

 

Fr. Martin discusses his book, Between Heaven and Mirthand tells Mr. Colbert that Jesus probably had a pretty good sense of humor. 

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement

The latest from america

Catherine Pakaluk, who currently teaches at the Catholic University of America and holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University, describes her tweet to Mr. Macron as “spirited” and “playful.”
Emma Winters October 19, 2018
A new proposal from the Department of Homeland Security could make it much more difficult for legal immigrants to get green cards in the United States. But even before its implementation, the proposal has led immigrants to avoid receiving public benefits.
J.D. Long-GarcíaOctober 19, 2018
 Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, then nuncio to the United States, and then-Cardinal Theodore E. McCarrick of Washington, are seen in a combination photo during the beatification Mass of Blessed Miriam Teresa Demjanovich at the Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart in Newark, N.J., Oct. 4, 2014. (CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz)
In this third letter Archbishop Viganò no longer insists, as he did so forcefully in his first letter, that the restrictions that he claimed Benedict XVI had imposed on Archbishop McCarrick—one he alleges that Pope Francis later lifted—can be understood as “sanctions.”
Gerard O’ConnellOctober 19, 2018
Kevin Clarke tells us about his reporting from Iraq.
Olga SeguraOctober 19, 2018