February 25, 2008

Vol. 198 No. 6Whole No. 4805 Download PDF

Editorials

Current Comment
Coral Reefs Under Assault

More than two dozen conservation organizations and 17 countries have designated 2008 the Year of the Reef.

The Bush Legacy
In the wake of the Super Tuesday primary elections on Feb. 5, the field of candidates for the 2008 presidential nominations has been clearly defined.

Articles

Holy Dirt
James Martin, SJ
A pilgrimage to Chimayo, the Lourdes of America
The Mysteries of Lourdes
Lori Erickson
When I told a friend who has traveled many times to France that I was planning to visit Lourdes, her reaction was a mixture of surprise and concern. Lourdes? she asked.
On the Road
Chris Manahan
Eight months after entering the novitiate in St. Paul, Minn., each novice preparing to take vows in the Society of Jesus is sent out on pilgrimage with $35 in cash.

Books and Culture

Books
Healing the Split
Denise Lardner Carmody
'Rome and Canterbury,' reviewed
Books
The Past Is Not a Happy Place
Peter Heinegg
Over a century ago, in 1905, an unknown young writer named James Joyce was having a hard time finding a publisher for Dubliners

Columns and Departments

The Word
Blindness and Sight
Daniel J. Harrington
Faith in Focus
Getting Away From the Kids
Stephen Martin
The spiritual rewards of business travel
Columns
Our Last Innocents
Terry Golway
'Fair play has always been more of an ideal than a working principle.'
Of Many Things
Of Many Things
Dennis M. Linehan
Letters
Letters

Web Only

  Really Short Stories
The Editors
In a Current Comment item in the America issue of March 2, 2008, the editors commented on microfiction, the venerable subgenre of fic
  Blogging the Presidential Primaries
Michael Sean Winters
Psychology for Losing There are two times when a political campaign is in most danger of making critical mistakes: first, when a campaign s
  Blogging the Presidential Primaries
Michael Sean Winters
Psychology for Losing There are two times when a political campaign is in most danger of making critical mistakes: first, when a
  Really Short Stories
The Editors
In a Current Comment item in the America issue of March 2, 2008, the editors commented on “microfiction,” the venerable subgenre of fiction that forsakes the traditional short story length, usually multiples of thousands, in favor of extremely brief tales that are sometimes even less than one hundred words. Also known as “flash fiction,” “sudden fiction” and “short shorts,” microfiction normally includes the typical elements of a short story but has to achieve much by allusion, implication and evocation of outside elements. In the Current Comment item, the editors referenced what is perhaps American literary history’s most famous example of microfiction, Ernest Hemingway’s six-word short story: “For Sale: Baby shoes, never worn.” Few facts are present in that sentence, but the reader’s imagination fleshes out the tale in rapid fashion, conjuring up a protagonist, a conflict, and a resolution without much effort. In an era when many people do their reading in front of a computer rather than in front of a crackling fire (pace Amazon.com’s new “Kindle” electronic reader), microfiction will only grow in popularity, since its format is ideally suited to the single page and the quick read. Some online stories and helpful tips about reading and writing microfiction are linked below, as well as two journals devoted to microfiction and its literary cousins. The Essentials of Microfiction by Camille Renshaw;
  Really Short StoriesXXX
The Editors
In a Current Comment item in the America issue of March 2, 2008, the editors commented on microfiction, the venerable subgenre of fiction that forsakes the traditional short story length, usually multiples of thousands, in favor of extremely brief tales that are sometimes even less than one hundred words. Also known as flash fiction, sudden fiction and short shorts, microfiction normally includes the typical elements of a short story but has to achieve much by allusion, implication and evocation of outside elements. In the Current Comment item, the editors referenced what is perhaps American literary historys most famous example of microfiction, Ernest Hemingways six-word short story: For Sale: Baby shoes, never worn. Few facts are present in that sentence, but the readers imagination fleshes out the tale in rapid fashion, conjuring up a protagonist, a conflict, and a resolution without much effort. In an era when many people do their reading in front of a computer rather than in front of a crackling fire (pace Amazon.coms new Kindle electronic reader), microfiction will only grow in popularity, since its format is ideally suited to the single page and the quick read. Some online stories and helpful tips about reading and writing microfiction are linked below, as well as two journals devoted to microfiction and its literary cousins. The Essentials of Microfiction by Camille Renshaw;