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February 25, 2008

Vol.198 / No.6
Books
Peter Heinegg February 25, 2008

Over a century ago in 1905 an unknown young writer named James Joyce was having a hard time finding a publisher for Dubliners his bitter collection of tales about the home town he had already left physically at least for good Shortly before this in a famous letter to his lover Nora Barnacle

Lori Erickson February 25, 2008

I prepared myself to be disappointed by this holy site, the most famous healing shrine in the world.

The Editors February 25, 2008

In a Current Comment item in the America issue of March 2, 2008, the editors commented on microfiction, the venerable subgenre of fiction that forsakes the traditional short story length, usually multiples of thousands, in favor of extremely brief tales that are sometimes even less than one hundred

Current Comment
The Editors February 25, 2008

Coral Reefs Under Assault More than two dozen conservation organizations and 17 countries have designated 2008 the Year of the Reef. Ten percent of the worlds coral reefs have already been damaged beyond recovery, according to the environmental group Eco-Pros, and two-thirds are being degraded, larg

Letters
February 25, 2008

Structures of Sin The Current Comment item on “Big Pharma and the Poor” (2/11) did not convey a proper understanding of the situation. The problem of access to health care for the poor seems to grow faster than we can find solutions. But blaming the pharmaceutical industry is not a solut

Columns
Terry Golway February 25, 2008

The timing was exquisite. A voice on the radio, trying to entice viewers to one of those “Survivor”-type reality shows, promised that the program’s competition would be extremely intense. “We don’t play fair,” the voice intoned. “We play to win.” This

The Editors February 25, 2008

In a Current Comment item in the America issue of March 2, 2008, the editors commented on “microfiction,” the venerable subgenre of fiction that forsakes the traditional short story length, usually multiples of thousands, in favor of extremely brief tales that are sometimes even