JesuiticalOctober 30, 2020
A scene from the documentary "The Devil and Father Amorth." Pauline Father Gabriele Amorth, who was chief exorcist of the Diocese of Rome. (CNS photo/The Orchard) 

Movies about demons and exorcisms are popular at this time of year, and are—let’s be honest—pretty scary. Well, real life demonic possession is even scarier—and nothing to mess around with.

This week, we talk with someone who would know. Dr. Richard Gallagher is a board-certified psychiatrist, a leading expert in the field of exorcism and the author of Demonic Foes: My Twenty-Five Years as a Psychiatrist Investigating Possessions, Diabolic Attacks, and the Paranormal.

Dr. Gallagher recounts hard-won lessons about the spiritual life as well as some of his most harrowing experiences with literal demons.

In “Signs of the Times,” we look at the 13 new cardinals that Pope Francis named over the weekend, including Washington’s Archbishop Wilton Gregory, who is set to become the first Black Cardinal in the United States.

A reminder that we’ll be discussing Pope Francis’ latest encyclical, “Fratelli Tutti” in reading groups (over drinks) with all members of our Patreon community throughout the month of November. It starts next week, but there’s still time to sign up to support the show and guarantee a spot in the reading group.

Links from the show:

Demonic Foes
Dr. Richard Gallagher, Demonic Possession Expert, Isn't Trying to Convince You
Pope Francis names 13 new cardinals, including Wilton Gregory, the archbishop of Washington D.C.
How long will the Latino community have to wait for a cardinal in the United States?

What’s on tap:

Witches’ Brew, also known as a gin and tonic made with Empress Gin for spooky coloring.

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