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March 5, 2001

Vol.184 / No.7
Books
Marie Anne MayeskiMarch 05, 2001

Sandra Schneiders rsquo new book on religious life in the Catholic community is a veritable buffet feast of data reflection analysis and opinion there is plenty here to make many people uncomfortable and some probably irritated But there is even more that will give hope to manyboth inside and o

Letters
Our readersMarch 05, 2001

Spirit Shared

The acclamations of James Martin, S.J., in support of women religious (1/8) and women in general in the church have lifted me right out of my chair. With a loud Amen! praise to you and to the Spirit that inspired and fired you up to speak a truth that needs to be

The Word
John R. DonahueMarch 05, 2001

The Gospel this week is the second half of the diptych that presents Jesus rsquo anticipated suffering the temptation and his ultimate exaltation the transfiguration All the Synoptic Gospels recount the transfiguration but each has its distinctive accents While Mark and Matthew locate it aft

Genevieve CassaniMarch 05, 2001

It was hot standing outside the row of one-room wooden “houses,” and I could not keep the mosquitoes and gnats away from my face and arms as we spoke. I poked around inside a small two-bed cubicle at their invitation—aware that the only access to air besides the screenless window w

James Martin, SJMarch 05, 2001

Widely regarded as the dean of American Catholic theologians, Avery Dulles, S.J., was created a cardinal by Pope John Paul II at a consistory in Rome on Feb. 21. He is the first U.S. theologian to be named to the College of Cardinals, as well as the first American Jesuit to receive this honor. The s

Books
Peter R. BeckmanMarch 05, 2001

What to do about China Steven Mosher thumps for the containment of China by reinvigorating American alliances with its Asian allies denying access to technologies that enhance China rsquo s military making trade dependent on ending human rights abuses and unabashedly seeking the continuation of A

John F. KavanaughMarch 05, 2001

On the day the most complete mapping of the human genome was announced, a human-made spacecraft landed on an asteroid named Eros, almost 200 million miles away from earth. Issuing commands into deep space, smart little specks on our planet slowed the craft’s descent onto the asteroid for a lan