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  • The last time I venerated a relic was at the baseball hall of fame in Cooperstown. In game six of the American League Championship Series, Curt Schilling pitched against the Yankees after undergoing a surgery intended to staple his injured ankle together. Schilling pitched masterfully, and the Red Sox won the game and the series the next day. Schilling’s performance seems that much more heroic because he pitched through pain and injury clearly manifest in the blood that soaked through his...

  • Copyright: Dream Perfection

    As we mark the 50th anniversary of "Dei Verbum," the Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation, promulgated by Pope Paul VI on Nov. 18, 1965, we note that one effect has been increased study of and prayer with the Scriptures by all the faithful, not only scholars and professional ministers. Women’s Bible study groups have sprung up in many parishes and dioceses and the number of women biblical scholars who hold doctorates in Sacred Scripture has risen markedly in the past five decades. At...

  • Two and a half weeks ago, after 10 years of religious life, I was ordained a deacon. Suddenly, my life includes dedicated, quite public weekend work. Suddenly, I am charged with preaching the word of God at several Masses in three different parishes. It is fantastic, but grinding work. I have been a relentless critic of windy, meandering, irrelevant homilies for many years. As I said in my first homily, I have been to a lot of Masses over the last several years, and I have never said, nor...

  • October 26, 2015

    Anyone who can sustain reading the Bible beyond the first chapter of Genesis will notice that there are difficult passages. The Bible’s stories are forged out of murder (Gn 4), rape (Gn 34), dismemberment (Jgs 19; 1 Sam 18), kidnapping and forced marriages (Jgs 21), forced migration and infanticide (Ps 137), slavery (Ex 21; Lv 25; Dt 15), genocide (Jos 1-12), cannibalism (2 Kgs 6-7), political corruption (1-2 Kgs) and social desolation (the Prophets). The...

  • October 5, 2015

    There are certain things we know deeply, risk our lives upon, but can never adequately explain to ourselves or others. This is particularly true of the death of Jesus and how that death washes us clean of sin, opens the gates of heaven for us and teaches how to give our own deaths away as he did.

    That Jesus’ death does these things is a core truth that underlies most everything within our Christian faith. We celebrate it in...

  • The Bible is an unwieldy resource on any subject. Its depth creates currents that pull us in many different directions, and the numerous voices, speaking from across hundreds of years from the ruins and richness of numerous empires, can sometimes sound more like a cacophony than a choir. When it comes to disability, Western societies have a history of reading disability as an aberration. This is not only the case when it comes to reading the Bible. But in light of this way of looking at...

  • September 21, 2015

    From the risk of creation in Genesis through the startling visions of Revelation, the physical human body commands the Bible’s narrative. God makes the earth creature ( adama ) in the divine image and likeness, makes them male and female, animates the body with divine breath and deems the body—and all creation— very good (Gn 1:26–27, 31; 2:7). Thus, the essential corporeality of human existence emerges in the very act of creation. The divine affirmation of...

  • August is a spectacular month in the northeast of the United States. It is hot, the days are long, the ocean is warm enough for swimming, and the trees and shrubs wear a deep green. Northeasterners know that this will not last, that just on the other side of a short autumn will be a grim winter. Yet, during August, there is still time to linger outside, to listen to baseball on the radio, and to read books that are truly, truly enjoyable.

    The Catholic Book Club interrupts its series...

  • A reflection from Meghan J. Clark of St. John's University on the Old and New Testament roots of Catholic social teaching.

  • “When I consider your heavens, the work of your fingers, the moon and the stars, what is man that you are mindful of him, or the Son of Man that you care for him?” (Psalm 8:3-4)

    Our Hebrew ancestors wrote the Bible informed by their observations of creation. Because their reflections on God were written within that context, they possessed a wisdom about the material world that can be amazingly accurate. Through three examples from the sciences of chemistry, astronomy and physics, we...