The National Catholic Review

News

  • The Catholic bishops of Scotland said they accept the results of referendum in which Scot voters rejected independence.

    In a Sept. 19 statement, the Bishops' Conference of Scotland also commended "all those who participated in what was a passionate and sometimes partisan debate."

    "The vast majority of Scots engaged with the referendum and it is our hope that we can all now cooperate for the benefit of our nation in the future," it said.

    The Sept. 18 vote on whether...

  • Supporters of Scottish independence did not see the result they were hoping for, but it is fair to say that democracy won in a national referendum that included 85 percent of Scotland’s eligible voters. At eight minutes past six on Friday morning, Sept. 19, “No” crossed the line. The result, 55 to 45 percent for “No,” a tad wider than some anticipated, is clear, but brought no closure to the debate; the conversation moves into even newer, just as uncharted waters.

  • The extraordinary Synod of Bishops on the family will not open until Oct. 5, but some of its most prominent members are already publicly debating what is bound to be one of its most controversial topics: the eligibility of divorced and civilly remarried Catholics to receive Communion.

    In an interview published Sept. 18, a proponent of changing church practice to allow such Catholics to receive Communion answered criticism from some of his fellow cardinals, suggesting they are seeking...

  • Today's bishops must be as vigilant and courageous as sentinels keeping watch over the faith, and as forgiving and patient as Moses, leading a sinning people across harsh deserts to God, Pope Francis said.

    Their vocation is not to be wardens of a failed estate, "but custodians of 'Evangelii gaudium' (the joy of the gospel); therefore, you cannot be without the only treasure we really have to give, and that the world cannot give itself: the joy of God's love," he told new bishops.

  • The U.S. bishops' pro-life chairman on Sept. 16 urged Congress to bring the federal health care law "into compliance with the Hyde amendment" and exclude elective abortions from health plans subsidized with federal funds.

    "At a minimum, Congress should not delay in enacting a law to require full disclosure of abortion coverage and abortion premiums to Americans purchasing health plans," said Cardinal Sean P. O'Malley of Boston, who is chairman of the U.S. bishops' Committee on Pro-...

  • "We the people, we the voters" is the theme of the third "Nuns on the Bus" tour, which kicked off Sept. 17 in Des Moines with Vice President Joe Biden thanking the sisters for their effort.

    The sisters began a 10-state tour promoting voter registration and participation in the political process.

    "With the vice president, we share faith and a commitment to democracy," said Sister Simone Campbell, a Sister of Social Service, who is the executive director of Network, a nonprofit...

  • I was born in Scotland in 1960 to an Irish mother and Scottish father; all four of my grandparents were Irish. Growing up in Scotland I never felt uncomfortable having "dual nationality." Indeed I am now the proud owner of two passports, one British and one Irish. Both of these documents mean a lot to me, they signify who I am, i.e., a Celt and a Brit. It is the latter part that is the part of my identity that is now under threat. I write this on the eve of the most momentous decision that...

  • When you think of the dangers posed today by pertussis, commonly known as whooping cough—actually, why would you? There’s been a vaccine for pertussis since the 1940s. Before then, an average of 178,00 cases were reported in the United States each year. By 1976, that number had dropped to less than 1,000.

    But 40 years later, in the first 8 months of 2014, Los Angeles County alone has over 1,300 reported cases of whooping cough. The state of California has 8,000 cases and has declared...

  • September 29. 2014

    At least 124,000 migrants entered Italy in the first eight months of this year, more than twice the 60,000 who arrived in all of 2013. The vast majority landed first in Sicily. Seeing to the new arrivals’ immediate needs in Sicily’s multiple port cities is now a joint effort between church and civil society. In January, the Palermo branch of Caritas signed a convention with city authorities to open four centers for migrants, known as extraordinary welcome...

  • September 29. 2014

    President Obama’s decision to delay executive measures on immigration until after the November elections drew sharp rebukes from some of the most vocal advocates for immigrants, while others continued to urge specific actions toward reform and analysts weighed whether the delay hurts or helps candidates in close congressional races.