The National Catholic Review

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  • December 5-12, 2016

    While the number of women in the U.S. Congress is not expected to change significantly once all the votes are counted from last month’s election, several women will make history by joining that body. The U.S. Senate will add Catherine Cortez Masto, the first Latina senator; Tammy Duckworth, the first female senator to have seen combat and only the second Asian-American senator; and...

  • December 5-12, 2016

    “Serving and welcoming people fleeing violence and conflict in various regions of the world is part of our identity as Catholics,” Auxiliary Bishop Eusebio Elizondo of Seattle said at the bishops’ annual meeting in Baltimore on Nov. 15. With more than 65 million displaced people in the world today, the head of the bishops’ migration committee pledged that “our 80 dioceses across the country are eager to continue this wonderful act of accompaniment.”

    In the wake of the election of...

  • December 5-12, 2016

    At the end of 2016, the nation continues to grapple with police violence toward unarmed black men, unprovoked attacks on police officers, the threat of mass deportations and the re-emergence of white nationalism as a political force. Tensions are high across the country, but many Americans, the U.S. bishops included, are eager to work against racial injustice and inequality and toward healing and reconciliation. The urgency of this issue was conveyed at the recent gathering of the U.S....

  • November 28, 2016

    Slowly, the death penalty is gaining ground again. Though many states have abolished the practice, residents of Oklahoma, California and Nebraska voted in favor of the death penalty on Election Day.

    Nov. 7 marked the start of the federal death penalty trial of Dylann S. Roof, the white 22-year-old who a year and a half ago shot and killed nine African-American worshipers in a church in Charleston, S.C. Meanwhile, at the trials both of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev for the Boston Marathon...

  • November 28, 2016

    As the United States chose an unorthodox new president, the citizens of Maine quietly approved an unorthodox way of electing people to office. Ranked-choice voting is used in a few municipalities, but Maine would be the first state to use the system for gubernatorial, congressional and legislative races (if the referendum proposal withstands any court challenges). As The...

  • November 28, 2016

    The demolition of the Calais “Jungle,” a vast migrant camp that had grown up around the entrance to the tunnel connecting France and the United Kingdom, left scores of children adrift amid smoldering ruins in October. Like the adult migrants around them, these unaccompanied minors, some as young as 8, had made it as far as Calais, hoping to find sanctuary in Great Britain....

  • November 21, 2016

    In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus laid out many of the qualities he hopes his followers will embody, including mercy, meekness and cleanness of heart. In offering these hopes, Jesus was speaking not only to the people of his time but to each of us today. There is much to be gained from revisiting these always-relevant words of wisdom. Yet the modern age represents distinct challenges, so Pope Francis, during his recent trip to Sweden, offered some additions to the Gospel lists of beatitudes...

  • November 21, 2016

    Americans might be forgiven if they thought they had put the great pipeline wars behind them with the abandonment of the giant Keystone XL. Concern that the lives of U.S. citizens were likely to be disrupted in the service of a foreign oil company was among the arguments that eventually doomed Keystone. That must seem all too ironic to the members of the Standing Rock Sioux community in their months-long resistance to the $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline, which, they contend, is a threat...

  • November 21, 2016

    What does it mean, as a medical provider, to participate in a procedure that you find morally objectionable? This is the question at the heart of a federal lawsuit filed in September against the State of Illinois by three local pregnancy centers. In July, Illinois passed a law that requires doctors, hospitals and pregnancy centers to refer patients who ask about abortion to local providers if they do not provide the service themselves. The law was signed by Governor Bruce Rauner, a...

  • November 14, 2016

    When Facebook employees noted that a number of Donald J. Trump’s posts—for example, his call for a ban on Muslims entering the United States—violated the site’s hate speech policy, Mark Zuckerberg stepped in to preserve them in the name of free speech. In a leaked internal message published by The Wall Street Journal, Mr. Zuckerberg explained: “I know there are strong views on the election this year both in the US...