The National Catholic Review

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  • A U.S. district court last month upheld a 2013 North Carolina law that ostensibly targets voter fraud by requiring photo identification at the polls, eliminating same-day registration and reducing early-voting periods. Opponents had argued that the changes disproportionately burdened low-income and minority voters who lacked driver’s licenses, but Judge Thomas Schroeder ruled that...

  • May 9, 2016

    In early April, a $160-billion deal between the pharmaceutical giants Allergan and Pfizer fell apart when its tax advantages disappeared. Originally, Pfizer had planned the merger as a tax inversion—a maneuver that would have shifted Pfizer’s tax residency to Ireland, where Allergan is headquartered and subject to a 14 percent corporate tax rate instead of the 35 percent rate Pfizer faces in the United States. New Treasury Department rules, however, would have prevented Pfizer from escaping...

  • May 9, 2016

    In “The Joy of Love,” Pope Francis reminds readers that while new technologies can be a force for good, they can also place the most vulnerable at risk. “We cannot ignore the risks that these new forms of communication pose for children and adolescents,” Francis says, adding that technology “exposes them more easily to manipulation by those who would invade their private space with selfish interests” (No. 278). According to a study from the GSM Association...

  • May 9, 2016

    A proposed new bill to legalize physician-assisted suicide in Canada has drawn strong opposition from an impressive coalition of religious voices. Standing together at a press conference on April 19, Catholic, Jewish, evangelical and Muslim leaders registered their grave concern about the measure proposed by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and made an admirable pledge: “Our churches, synagogues and mosques are committed to comfort and care for those who are...

  • May 2, 2016

    In “The Joy of Love” (“Amoris Laetitia”), Pope Francis urges Catholics to consult their consciences for guidance when making moral decisions. He might be glad to hear that a recent study found many Catholics already are doing just that. According to the Pew Research Center, 73 percent of Catholics “look to their own conscience ‘a great deal’ for guidance on difficult moral questions.” The statistics demonstrate that the exhortation is not simply a...

  • May 2, 2016

    In April 2014 President Obama announced an initiative to expedite the clemency application process for federal inmates, many of whom would have already finished serving their time if sentenced under today’s less draconian guidelines. One of these is Norman Brown, who in 1993 was given a sentence of life without parole—a punishment the sentencing judge said was too harsh—for distributing crack cocaine, the minimum mandated because of his two previous minor...

  • May 2, 2016

    A new book by the German author and Russia expert Boris Reitschuster, scheduled for release on April 15, reveals activities by Russia’s President Vladimir Putin to train small military units throughout Western Europe. The book, Putins Verdeckter Krieg ( Putin’s Secret War ), relies on extensive interviews with Western intelligence sources to draw a picture of an operation designed to cause trouble in the West.

    Britain’s...

  • April 25, 2016

    On March 8, International Women’s Day, the Fidel Götz Foundation and Jesuit Refugee Service co-hosted “Voices of the Faith” in Rome. The event centered on the “stories of remarkable women” who work in a variety of areas, from providing refugees with education to fighting human trafficking. One panel that focused on the role of women in the Catholic Church included a talk from Dr. Carolyn Woo, president and C.E.O. of Catholic Relief Services. “The role of...

  • April 25, 2016

    The Supreme Court unanimously ruled on April 4 that states may count all residents, not only eligible voters, in drawing election districts so that they are all approximately the same size. The decision was hailed as an affirmation of the equal-representation principle, but it raises rather than resolves the question of who has the right to be heard in state legislatures, city councils and the like.

    The court declined to...

  • April 25, 2016

    On tax evasion and hidden wealth, we are awash in a “sea of criminality,” said Jeffrey Sachs, an economist at Columbia University, on April 5. Mr. Sachs offered the opening lecture at the conference “For the Planet and the Poor,” sponsored by the Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame. Surveying the revelations emerging from the so-called Panama Papers, a vast, unauthorized dump of financial documents, he reiterated a point he has...