The National Catholic Review

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  • January 2, 2017

    It is not a good time to be a journalist in Turkey. Since the failed coup attempt against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan last July, his government has been cracking down on its critics in the media. As of Dec. 1, 81 Turkish journalists were in prison facing anti-state charges, according to a new report from the Committee to Protect Journalists. Typical is the case of Mehmet Baransu, a former columnist for the daily newspaper Taraf, who was arrested and charged with “obtaining secret...

  • January 2, 2017

    “Peace is the only true direction of human progress—and not the tensions caused by ambitious nationalisms, nor conquests by violence, nor repressions which serve as mainstay for a false civil order.” These words appear in this year’s papal message for the World Day of Peace, but they do not come from Pope Francis. They are the words of Pope Paul VI, written for the first World Day of Peace, observed on Jan. 1, 1968. Nearly 50 years later, as Francis points out in his own message, these words...

  • January 2, 2017

    The constitutional process for approval of cabinet appointments has rarely seemed so crucial. The lack of experience in government or public service in expected nominees like Rex W. Tillerson, for secretary of state, Andrew F. Puzder, for secretary of labor, and Ben Carson, for secretary of housing and urban development, is just the beginning of the issues the senators will have to consider when vetting these individuals.

    There are also large potential conflicts of interest for...

  • December 19-26, 2016

    This Christmas season, many of us will find ourselves scrolling through social media feeds filled with countless pictures of holiday cheer. Does this window into the festivities of friends and acquaintances help us to share in the joy of the season or make us feel left out in the cold? Like any technology, it depends on how we use it.

    In 2011, the American Academy of Pediatrics introduced the term “Facebook...

  • December 19-26, 2016

    A disturbed Somali teenager who had come to the United States with his mother and six siblings in 2014 went on a rampage at The Ohio State University on Nov. 28. He was quickly gunned down by police but not before he used his car and a knife to injure 11 people. The incident is sure to encourage more calls for restrictions on refugees and attacks on faith groups that facilitate resettlement or advocate on behalf of refugees...

  • December 19-26, 2016

    One of the signs of a functioning democracy is confidence in data from the government. The United States has several agencies that let us know “what’s going on,” to use a favorite phrase of President-elect Donald J. Trump. The Census Bureau remains the gold standard for information about topics like poverty, household income and the persistence of racial segregation. Other sources of data about our nation, and our universe, include the F.B.I. ,...

  • December 5-12, 2016

    While the number of women in the U.S. Congress is not expected to change significantly once all the votes are counted from last month’s election, several women will make history by joining that body. The U.S. Senate will add Catherine Cortez Masto, the first Latina senator; Tammy Duckworth, the first female senator to have seen combat and only the second Asian-American senator; and...

  • December 5-12, 2016

    “Serving and welcoming people fleeing violence and conflict in various regions of the world is part of our identity as Catholics,” Auxiliary Bishop Eusebio Elizondo of Seattle said at the bishops’ annual meeting in Baltimore on Nov. 15. With more than 65 million displaced people in the world today, the head of the bishops’ migration committee pledged that “our 80 dioceses across the country are eager to continue this wonderful act of accompaniment.”

    In the wake of the election of...

  • December 5-12, 2016

    At the end of 2016, the nation continues to grapple with police violence toward unarmed black men, unprovoked attacks on police officers, the threat of mass deportations and the re-emergence of white nationalism as a political force. Tensions are high across the country, but many Americans, the U.S. bishops included, are eager to work against racial injustice and inequality and toward healing and reconciliation. The urgency of this issue was conveyed at the recent gathering of the U.S....

  • November 28, 2016

    Slowly, the death penalty is gaining ground again. Though many states have abolished the practice, residents of Oklahoma, California and Nebraska voted in favor of the death penalty on Election Day.

    Nov. 7 marked the start of the federal death penalty trial of Dylann S. Roof, the white 22-year-old who a year and a half ago shot and killed nine African-American worshipers in a church in Charleston, S.C. Meanwhile, at the trials both of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev for the Boston Marathon...