Gulf States Wait For Recovery

While pundits and politicians observe the first signs of a spring thaw in the troubled economy of the United States, workers in Gulf South states are still waiting for signs that their lives will be better. According to a new report from the Pew Economic Policy Group, in the Gulf South the number of unemployed persons has more than doubled to 2,654,281 in February 2010 from 1,208,649 in February 2008. While Louisiana—still “benefiting” from hurricane recovery spending—and Texas continue to have unemployment levels below the national average of 9.7 percent, Florida (12.2 percent), Mississippi (11.4 percent) and Alabama (11.1 percent) endure rates that exceed the national level. Alabama has seen the greatest growth in unemployment—a 156 percent increase in just two years. Mississippi was not far behind with a 145 percent increase. Already, 3.5 million workers nationally have been out of work for more than a year, the highest number of workers idled for so long since World War II.

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

“Amoris Laetitia” addresses the reality of Catholics in “non-legitimate unions” and opens the possibility for them to receive the Eucharist under certain conditions.
Gerard O'ConnellFebruary 22, 2017
Immigration officials “no longer will exempt classes or categories of removable aliens from potential enforcement” and “have full authority to arrest or apprehend an alien whom an immigration officer has probable cause to believe is in violation of the immigration laws.”
Michael O'LoughlinFebruary 21, 2017
El sistema de libre empresa es compatible con nuestra preocupación por los desfavorecidos, escribe un economista y católico converso.
Arthur C. BrooksFebruary 21, 2017
The pope's emphasis on protecting undocumented workers is particularly significant for Europe and the United States, where the treatment of refugees and migrants has been a consistent challenge.
Gerard O'ConnellFebruary 21, 2017