Mexican Immigration Down by 40 Percent

Mexican immigration to the U.S. has continued to dwindle this year and is down at least 40 percent from 2005, according to a July analysis released by the Pew Hispanic Center, a nonpartisan research organization. Despite the decrease, the study shows no increase in the flow of immigrants returning to Mexico. "There have been sizable decreases in Mexican inflow before but not of this magnitude," said Jeff Passel, senior demographer of the Pew Hispanic Center. The analysis relied on data from population surveys taken in Mexico and the U.S. as well as figures from the U.S. Border Patrol, all of which pointed to similar conclusions regarding Mexican migration to and from the U.S. "In the 2002 to 2003 recession, the number of Mexicans entering the U.S. dropped by about 30 percent. We have seen Mexico's numbers go up and down with the state of the U.S. economy," Passel said. He added that the center has seen inflow decreases among other Latin American immigrants, aside from Mexicans, which also have coincided with the United States' weakening economic stability.

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