Causes of Nigerian Violence Debated

Even though the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom named Nigeria a “country of particular concern” on May 1, Catholic Archbishop John Olorunfemi Onaiyekan of Abuja, has said that the so-called religious violence between Muslims and Christians in Nigeria is not, in fact, about religion—a view that has been endorsed by the Sultan of Sokoto, one of Nigeria’s leading Muslims. These “are matters between groups with special interests,” the archbishop said during a meeting with members of the commission. Archbishop Onaiyekan attributed the conflicts to the corruption of politicians. Nigeria is an example of how opinions about religious freedom in a country can differ widely between international activists and a country’s native clergy. According to the commission, a country is designated as a country of concern when its government has “engaged in or tolerated systematic and egregious violations of the universal right to freedom of religion or belief.”

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

The Jesuits invite people of good will and members of Congress to call on the administration to reverse its decision the Dakota access pipeline.
Kevin ClarkeFebruary 23, 2017
Muslim groups have raised nearly $75,000 in a crowdfunding campaign for the Chesed Shel Emeth Society cemetery in University City, Missouri.
La medicina de Jesucristo para el estrés no es unas vacaciones en la playa para volver a empezar. Sino un cambio profundo de actitud. Se llama confianza.
Juan Luis CalderónFebruary 23, 2017
Instinct, emotion, intuition—all those elements that make politics, well, politics—still matter.
Matt Malone, S.J.February 23, 2017