JesuiticalJune 26, 2020
Los Angeles Auxiliary Bishop Robert E. Barron is shown in an undated photo. (CNS photo/courtesy Word on Fire)

If you’ve spent any time looking for Catholic resources online, you have certainly come across the work of Bishop Robert Barron. The auxiliary bishop for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles is the founder of Word on Fire Ministries and has been called a “Fulton Sheen for the 21st century.” He reaches millions of people over social media and has spoken about God in the expected (seminaries, Cathedrals) and unexpected (Google headquarters, Reddit AMAs) places alike.

We caught up with him to talk about his ministry during coronavirus, attracting controversy (yes, we talk about that Jordan Peterson interview), West Coast Catholicism and the recent Black Lives Matter protests.

This is our final show before our summer break. We’ll be popping in the feed periodically to share some thoughts and conversations with you, but otherwise we will be hard at work improving Jesuitical so we can come back better than ever in the fall. But to do that, we need your help.

Please tell us what you think about Jesuitical by filling out our listener survey. It will help us make the show better and tell our sponsors more about who you are. It takes about 10 minutes to fill out and can be found here.

Until then, please keep us in your prayers. We’ll be praying for you.

During the Covid-19 pandemic, the production of Jesuitical has been made possible, in part, by the generous support from American Bible Society. To learn more about American Bible Society and their amazing work visit www.americanbible.org.

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