Podcast: Meet the Catholic author behind a coronavirus poem that went viral

Credit: Laura Kelly Fanucci, Instagram: @thismessygrace 

Laura Fanucci was up in the middle of the night with her 5-week-old newborn when the words came to her: “When this is all over....” She wrote the poem on her phone and when she posted it on Instagram the next morning it caught fire. Politicians, celebrities, corporate brands and influencers shared her words with millions of people hungry to imagine what life will look like on the other side of the coronavirus pandemic.

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When she is not going viral, Laura is an author and mother of five who writes about parenting, grief and the sacramentality of everyday life. We ask her why she thinks her poem resonated with so many people, what her experience losing twin girls in a miscarriage taught her about processing and sharing our grief and how she is celebrating Holy Week in her very full house.

In Signs of the Times, we discuss the acquittal of Cardinal George Pell on charges of sexual abuse. What are the implications of the high-profile case in Australia for the wider church? Next, we talk about Holy Week at home: what we are (and aren’t) doing to mark the death and resurrection of our Lord in a time of closed churches and social distancing. 

We want to see your modified Easter celebrations, too. Show and tell us what you’re doing this week over on our Facebook page. During these strange and difficult times, we are committed to accompanying you all through this podcast and the larger Jesuitical community. If you can support our work by becoming a member of our Patreon community, we would be most grateful. Thank you, and Happy Easter!

Links from the show

Australia’s high court overturns guilty verdict against Cardinal George Pell on final appeal
Vatican responds with measure to Cardinal Pell’s acquittal and release from prison
Easter Sunday Mass with America Media
Franciscan Monastery of the Holy Land in America Good Friday livestream
“When This Is Over,” by Laura Fanucci 

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