News Briefs

Church leaders in India's Orissa state have dismissed a report on anti-Christian violence there as "one-sided," "fictitious" and "premeditated." S.C. Mohapatra, the retired judge who investigated last year's violence, said in his interim report that the attacks were not sectarian but rooted in tribal land disputes, UCA News reported on July 7. • A ruling that removes a federal injunction against a parental notification law for minors seeking abortion means "for the first time in decades Illinois will enjoy an entirely reasonable, if minimal, restriction on access to abortion," said Bob Gilligan, executive director of the Catholic Conference of Illinois on July 14. • Episcopal bishops, priests and lay delegates at their church's triennial convention in Anaheim, Calif., voted July 14 to affirm that their church believes the ordination process is open to all the baptized, including gays and lesbians. More than 70 percent of lay and clergy delegates in the church's House of Deputies approved the action according to reports. The move is certain to provoke further conflict within the Anglican Communion, which has been rocked by divisions over this and other issues. • Pope Benedict XVI underwent a procedure under local anesthesia to repair his right wrist on July 17, which he had fractured during the night of July 16-17, his personal physician said in a statement.

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

Pope Francis listens to a question from Vera Shcherbakova of the Itar-Tass news agency while talking with journalists aboard his flight from Cairo to Rome April 29. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)
The situation in North Korea, he added, has been heated for a long time, "but now it seems it has heated up too much, no?"
Gerard O'ConnellApril 29, 2017
Pope Francis greets children dressed as pharaohs and in traditional dress as he arrives to celebrate Mass at the Air Defense Stadium in Cairo April 29. (CNS photo/L'Osservatore Romano)
Francis took the risk, trusting in God. His decision transmitted a message of hope on the political front to all Egyptians, Christians and Muslims alike, who are well aware that their country is today a target for ISIS terrorists and is engaged in a battle against terrorism.
Gerard O'ConnellApril 29, 2017
Pope Francis greets the crowd as he arrives to celebrate Mass at the Air Defense Stadium in Cairo April 29. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)
The only kind of fanaticism that is acceptable to God is being fanatical about loving and helping others, Pope Francis said on his final day in Egypt.
U.S. President Donald Trump talks to journalists in the Oval Office at the White House on March 24 after the American Health Care Act was pulled before a vote. (CNS photo/Carlos Barria, Reuters)
Predictably Mr. Trump has also clashed with the Catholic Church and the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops on many of the policies he has promoted during his first 100 days.
Kevin ClarkeApril 28, 2017