Podcast: Why Pope Francis stripped the Vatican’s most powerful office of its assets

Pope Francis raises the Book of the Gospels as he celebrates Mass on the feast of the Epiphany in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican Jan. 6, 2021. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

Welcome to “Inside the Vatican”’s 100th episode!

This week, host Colleen Dulle and Vatican correspondent Gerard O’Connell celebrate their 100th episode, reminiscing on their favorite memories of the last two years of “Inside the Vatican.” They also give updates on Vatican City’s soon-to-arrive coronavirus vaccines and Pope Francis’ recent sciatica flare-up. (Don’t worry, he’s OK.)

Listen and subscribe to “Inside the Vatican” on Apple Podcasts and Spotify.

Colleen and Gerry also dive into a recent legally binding order from Pope Francis instructing the Vatican’s Secretariat of State, which was once its most powerful office, to transfer all of its assets to the Vatican’s financial oversight office and removing their office’s investing power. The decision comes as financial misconduct in the Secretariat of State is being investigated.

With the investigation ongoing, Colleen asks, is Pope Francis jumping the gun with this punitive measure?

Support “Inside the Vatican” by subscribing to America: americamagazine.org/subscribe

Links from the show:

Gerard O’Connell: Pope Francis cancels his New Year’s plans due to ‘a painful sciatica’

Gerard O’Connell: Pope Francis tests negative for Covid-19 after two close advisors were infected

Pope formally strips Vatican secretariat of state of assets

[Explore America’s in-depth coverage of Pope Francis.]

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