Kate Bowler on faith, cancer and the prosperity gospel

On this week’s episode, we talk with Kate Bowler, the author of the New York Times bestseller Everything Happens for a Reason (And Other Lies I’ve Loved). She just won a Christopher Award for the book. (The Christopher Awards were created in 1949 to celebrate authors, illustrators, writers, producers and directors whose work “affirms the highest values of the human spirit.”)

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Kate is a professor of Christian history at Duke Divinity School. For years, she has taught and written about the prosperity gospel, and, in Everything Happens for a Reason, she gives readers a personal perspective into what this theology represents.

We talk to Kate about her memoir, what her stage-IV cancer diagnosis taught her about American Christianity, her upcoming book on evangelical Christian women leaders and more.

In Signs of the Times, we discuss the terrorist attacks on Easter Sunday in Sri Lanka; changes to the Roman Curia at the Vatican; Peter’s Pence and how Pope Francis donates; affordable housing in New York City; and finally, we ask: Should you vote for presidential candidate because of his or her religion?

Feel free to send us your questions, concerns or cocktail recipes at jesuitical@americamedia.org, or join us for discussion on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Consider supporting Jesuitical by becoming a member of our Patreon community.

This week’s episode was sponsored by the award-winning documentary, “Hesburgh.” The film is out in select theaters nationwide today.

Links from the show:

Churches padlocked, schools closed week after Sri Lanka attacks

Catholic bishops condemn Poway synagogue shooting

Big changes to the Vatican’s Roman Curia are coming

Pope Francis donates $500,000 to help migrants in Mexico

New York archdiocese opens new affordable housing

List: Catholic presidential candidates since J.F.K.

What’s on tap?

Lent is over—Prosecco.

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