Cardinal Cupich: The Vatican abuse summit will focus on ‘responsibility, accountability and transparency’

 Chicago Cardinal Blase J. Cupich leads a catechesis session for World Youth Day pilgrims at the Parish of Our Mother of Perpetual Help in Panama City Jan. 25, 2019. (CNS photo/Chaz Muth  Chicago Cardinal Blase J. Cupich leads a catechesis session for World Youth Day pilgrims at the Parish of Our Mother of Perpetual Help in Panama City Jan. 25, 2019. (CNS photo/Chaz Muth

Many wonder if the upcoming summit on the protection of minors will result in a concrete response to the problem, given that Pope Francis and Vatican media have sought to downplay expectations.

But Cardinal Blase Cupich of Chicago, one of the four members of the committee that prepared the meeting, told America he is confident “we can expect decisive action to follow from the meeting...both in Rome and in dioceses worldwide.”

Advertisement

He recalled that Pope Francis “has made it clear that the meeting,” which will be held at the Vatican on Feb. 21 to Feb. 24, “has a twofold purpose.” First, “to serve as a catechesis and formation so that the world’s bishops and the superiors of religious orders understand more profoundly the suffering [of the] victim-survivors” and “to make sure that everyone in the church around the globe—in every culture—is clear about their responsibilities for child protection as well as what it means for bishops [and superiors of religious orders] to own this issue and be accountable for it.”

He said that the summit’s second purpose is “to advance a framework of protocols for responding to allegations of clergy sexual abuse.” That framework, he added, would “identify for everyone the concrete steps required to implement practices that safeguard children and to bring justice to victims in a way that is responsible, accountable and transparent—even in cultures where law enforcement or the government may not be reliable partners.”

Cardinal Cupich expects the summit to clarify “to all that they are not alone in implementing measures and that they have to resolve as a body, as the college of bishops, to own this issue.”

The cardinal emphasized that “the bishops and the religious superiors are the ones who must take the decisive action required at this meeting of claiming ownership in a collegial way for the proper handling of abuse cases and for holding each other accountable.”

He expects the summit to clarify “to all that they are not alone in implementing measures and that they have to resolve as a body, as the college of bishops, in cooperation with religious superiors, to own this issue.”

That will mean, he said, “working together on the level of the global church and returning to their individual countries with the clear call to action for each bishop, and religious superior, to handle abuse cases according to the standards set forth by the church.”

Some have accused Pope Francis of speaking out strongly against the triple abuses of power, conscience and sex but not acting as forcefully when it comes to penalizing those who have abused or covered up. Cardinal Cupich, however, does not share this view.

He told America, “Pope Francis has acknowledged and apologized for his mistakes, itself an important action, and a model for all bishops.” Moreover, “Francis has moved forward and forthrightly to make it clear in his Apostolic Letter ‘As a loving mother,’” published June 4, 2016, that a bishop “can be legitimately removed from office if he has through negligence committed or through omission facilitated acts that have caused grave harm to others, either to physical persons or to the community as a whole.”

He recalled that Pope Francis “has already acted accordingly in a number of cases,” such as in Chile, and “he has also clearly indicated the necessity of evaluating [existing] processes to assure the fulfillment of his commitment of accountability to victims and the Catholic community at large.”

“Pope Francis has acknowledged and apologized for his mistakes, itself an important action, and a model for all bishops.”

According to the cardinal, Pope Francis views the abuse of minors and vulnerable persons by clergy as “a global problem that requires a global response,” and “he wants all the bishops and religious superiors to be on the same page,” convening the February summit to ensure this is the case.

Cardinal Cupich said that while the church has been addressing this problem for more than 20 years, “there has never been a worldwide meeting of bishops on abuse.”

“The very fact that the pope has called this meeting,” he said, “indicates his resolve to make sure there is no doubt [in the mind of any bishop or religious superior] about what to do in such matters.”

He described the summit as “a clear signal that child protection must be a top priority, and no one can claim that this is not a problem in their part of the world.” The cardinal noted that “some have tried to make that case due to cultural sensitivities or other issues perceived to be more threatening, but the Holy Father is serving notice that this line of thinking is not acceptable and that the bishops throughout the entire church need to take responsibility for keeping children safe and holding everyone accountable.”

“At the same time,” he said, “the shape and dimensions of this problem differ from country to country, due to social, legal and cultural differences” and so “we need the church to establish a baseline understanding so that safe environments exist everywhere, but the applications could vary from place to place.”

Cardinal Cupich is a member of the committee established by Pope Francis in early December to prepare for the Feb. summit, together with Cardinal Oswald Gracias of India, Archbishop Charles Scicluna of Malta and Hans Zollner, S.J., of Germany, now at Rome’s Gregorian University. The committee sent a questionnaire asking the presidents of the 114 bishops’ conferences around the world to report back to Rome on what is being done in their respective national churches in response to the abuse scandal.

“We need the church to establish a baseline understanding so that safe environments exist everywhere.”

Cardinal Cupich revealed that 90 percent of the presidents of the bishops conferences and religious superiors have already responded. He said, “This information is being analyzed to get a better picture of what is being done in concrete circumstances, what challenges the church faces in different cultures and countries and what assistance is needed to assure global implementation.” He anticipated that the analysis of these responses will be made public “in some format yet to be determined.”

The U.S. cardinal confirmed that participants at the summit will be divided into small group sessions, by language, and will focus on “three main topics”: responsibility on day one, accountability, day two; and transparency on the summit’s third day.

He said that fuller details of the program and participants will be made known at a press conference in the Vatican on Feb. 18 at which members of the preparatory committee will be present.

Once the summit has ended, the cardinal said, “it will be up to the various conferences of bishops to make necessary adaptations that reflect their particular circumstances and cultures.” He said, “Task forces will be made available to help bishops’ conferences implement these steps in ways that are in keeping with the expectations outlined at the meeting.”

Survivors of abuse too will have a role at the summit, the Chicago cardinal said. Before the February meeting, Pope Francis had “asked participants to meet victim-survivors in their home countries, so that they will come to Rome carrying in their hearts a more personal understanding of the overwhelming pain and damage victims endure.”

During the summit, survivors “will participate by giving testimonies each day at the daily prayer services and at the penitential service.” The cardinal said that “listening to victim-survivors is what brings about real conversion of hearts and compels us to act.” For that reason, he said, “one of the topics for discussion will be how to assist and urge all bishops to personally connect to victims as part of their responsibilities, and to do so in a way that follows the example of Pope Francis.”

“The Holy See is aware of these horrendous abuses of women and is working on addressing them; however, in this meeting the priority focus will be on protecting children.”

Ten representatives of women’s religious orders will participate in the meeting, together with two women who are officials in Vatican offices and a number of female survivors of abuse by clergy. The question of the abuse of lay women and women religious by clergy has been a media focus recently. America asked the cardinal if this abuse of women would also be addressed at the summit.

“As Pope Francis has made clear,” he said, “the Holy See is aware of these horrendous abuses and is working on addressing them; however, in this meeting the priority focus will be on protecting children because they are particularly defenseless and voiceless. It is necessary that we start there.”

But, he added, “I am convinced that whatever we do in the church to improve the way we deal with sexual abuse of minors will be applicable to these other issues because those matters also involve responsibility, accountability and transparency.”

Cardinal Cupich said, “The protection of children and the weak is a core value of the church. It is also central to the role of the bishops in the life of the church, as we are pastors who care for the people of God. We take these matters extremely seriously. Failure to do so will continue to undermine the very mission of the church. We know that is what is at stake.”

Asked about the possibility that some in the church and in the political right in the United States may be using the abuse question to attack Pope Francis’ leadership of the church, Cardinal Cupich said, “We should not allow anything to divert our attention away from the priority of ensuring the safety of children around the world and holding accountable those who have harmed and those responsible for their safety.

“The Holy Father is uniting the church to pursue this priority,” he said. “This is where I am focusing my energies. How others may be responding to this moment is of little concern to me, if it distracts the church from this priority.”

Some commentators have asserted that the pontificate of Pope Francis is at stake in the February meeting, but Cardinal Cupich sees things differently: “It is not a question of what is at stake for the pontificate of Pope Francis, but what is at stake for the church.”

Indeed, he said, “We are fortunate to have a leader such as Pope Francis, who is uniting us in the call to respond strongly to the scandal in a way that ensures justice for victim-survivors, safe environments for all our people and accountability for all who fail in this regard.”

[Explore America’s in-depth coverage of the church abuse crisis.]

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
John Sharpe
2 months 1 week ago

This isn’t just about the abuse of minors. There are priests that may not be abusing minors but are still be living lifestyles that are not in accord with Catholic teachings. There is a culture within clergy and convents of the church that thinks they can have the Catholic Church support their paganistic beliefs and lifestyle. They need to leave the religious orders and get jobs in the private sector. They need to come clean and be more honest about their lifestyles. Why do so many still lie about this? The Catholic Church is not an employment center for those who want to live alternative lifestyles. It’s time to stop the charade.

Tim O'Leary
2 months 1 week ago

This is very discouraging. No mention of the recent problems that are tearing the Church apart: 1) the investigation of the enablers of soon-to-be Mr. McCarrick, who helped him rise to the top of the hierarchy despite widespread knowledge about his abusive proclivities, 2) the problems that have surfaced in the seminaries in the US and elsewhere, 3) the specific problem our Church seems to have of homosexual enabling (pope Francis calls it the gay lobby), 4) a fulsome response to Archbishops Vigano's charges, 5) Some explanation or contrition by Pope Francis of why he has been so frequently fooled into trusting his liberal leaning friends, only to be embarrassed later when they are arrested or investigated for double lives & homosexual abuse of adults & minors (like McCarrick, Fr. Inzoli (Don Mercedes), Monsignors RIcca, Charamsa & Capozzi, Bishop Barros & Cardinal Godfried Danneels) and most recently Argentine bishop Gustavo Oscar Zanchetta)

Lisa M
2 months 1 week ago

The fact that the Pope has been deceived, and has apologized offers great hope. He is not one of those who knows exactly what to say, yet does nothing, and cares even less. I have a lot of hope that he is trying to find goodness in our bishops to act, because I have little faith in them otherwise. So many appear to be self serving, and well versed on the 'credible' allegations lingo.............Vigano, Muller and Burke are no different than the ones who have covered up, they are self serving and bitter, and ignore that the Vicar of Christ, as promised by our Lord, will not error on faith and morals. His message of mercy has fallen on their deaf ears, as somehow they believe, even though it is against Church teaching, that they know more than the Pope, and are the true guardians of the faith. God help us if these bitter, egotistical 'leaders' continue to get our ear. I'd much prefer to listen to someone who is trying to find a solution, and gets fooled sometimes, then listen to someone who knows it all and believes they are never wrong.

Sarah Dolski
2 months 1 week ago

Hi Lisa! I agree with the majority of what you are saying. However, the comment regarding the pope “ not erroring on faith and morals” must also be balanced with the undeniable reality that , although it be few, the Church has had a history of bad popes. I want to reiterate that I don’t think Pope Francis falls into this category, however the church needs, at times, other consecrated leaders such as the ones you mentioned, to encourage clarity in doctrine and accountability when necessary.

Tim Donovan
2 months ago

Hello, Lisa. I also am hopeful that Pope Francis, despite some unfortunate failings in the past regarding the mortal sin and crime of clergy sexual abuse, has found his voice and is doing his best to address this crisis. I am glad that former Cardinal McCarrick has been laicized. All clergy of whatever position should be laicized if they have been credibly accused of rape, and then turned over to civil authorities for prosecution. If found guilty of a crime, of course they should be imprisoned. The fact that such priests have been removed from the clerical state should hopefully help restore the good name of priests in our nation. I believe that most priests are good, faithful men committed to following the teachings of Jesus, as interpreted by the Church. As you mention, the Pope has the assurance of Jesus of not being in error in matters of faith and morals. As Jesus taught in Scripture, "...you are Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church, and all the powers of hell will not conquer it." ( Matthew 16: 18).

John Phillips
2 months 1 week ago

More of the same it seems to me! We have been dealing with this for almost 20 years! The time for penance services, discussion groups, catechesis, introspection and other “theobabble” is past. I, and most other Catholics, want action and want it now! This isn’t just about protecting minors. This is about holding bishops and cardinals and popes accountable for the cancer of impropriety and the gutless leadership that currently passes for leadership in the Church! How can one with an informed conscience continue to participate in a Church that sanctions the behavior of leadership that covers up, redirects, obsfugates and continues to kick the can down the road. The US bishops, to their credit, were willing to move forward and implement reforms, but were blindsided by the Vatican, asked to wait until after this bogus meeting in order to get a feel for the universal Church’s response to this crisis! I am about ready to walk away, and so arenany others who feel betrayed by Church leadership! Who needs the middleman to connect andhave s personal relationship with God the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, especially a middle man who has become so corrupt and uncaring!

John Phillips
2 months 1 week ago

More of the same it seems to me! We have been dealing with this for almost 20 years! The time for penance services, discussion groups, catechesis, introspection and other “theobabble” is past. I, and most other Catholics, want action and want it now! This isn’t just about protecting minors. This is about holding bishops and cardinals and popes accountable for the cancer of impropriety and the gutless leadership that currently passes for leadership in the Church! How can one with an informed conscience continue to participate in a Church that sanctions the behavior of leadership that covers up, redirects, obsfugates and continues to kick the can down the road. The US bishops, to their credit, were willing to move forward and implement reforms, but were blindsided by the Vatican, asked to wait until after this bogus meeting in order to get a feel for the universal Church’s response to this crisis! I am about ready to walk away, and so arenany others who feel betrayed by Church leadership! Who needs the middleman to connect andhave s personal relationship with God the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, especially a middle man who has become so corrupt and uncaring!

Dennis Doyle
2 months 1 week ago

John Phillips’ summary of the situation is spot on. It is also sad. Just as the clerics have been slow to a close a gaping wound in the institutional church, Mr. Phillips has been slow to recognize that his spirituality should never have been anchored in the institution which he is just now threatening to leave.
He says he may no longer need or want clerics to mediate his salivation. His comments reveal his anger and hurt that his belief system, rooted in clericalism, has betrayed him. He is having a hard time separating his faith, his longing for God, from an institution he now recognizes is teeming with corruption. I pray that Mr. Phillips, and all other Catholics similarly situated, turn the energy charging their anger toward the insutution, into energy to find The God who resides among us, the One untethered to any institution.

Crystal Watson
2 months 1 week ago

I don't think anything will come of the meeting. It shouldn't be so hard ...1) all instances of sex abuse should be reported to civil authorities, 2) make this reporting mandatory in every parish in every country. I doubt they will even do this.

Tim Donovan
2 months ago

Hello, Crystal. A priest who was one of my teachers years ago raped a minor boy, and fortunately was imprisioned. Although Pope Francis has at times dealt poorly with the problem of sexual abuse by priests and bishops, I think for sometime now he has by meeting with victims of abuse become very sensitive to the trauma they experienced. I believe that the Pope is making a good faith effort to address this crisis. Certainly, I believe that in the United States clergy who sexually abuse minors or rape vulnerable adults (such as nuns) should be handed over to civil authorities for prosecution, and imprisoned if found guilty. As Cardinal Cupich stated, because of the laws and cultures in some countries, it may be more difficult for abusive clergy to be held criminally accountable. It may well take time for the government officials in some countries to "catch up" with the " modern " understanding of how sexual abusive persons must be dealt with (a trial and prison if found guilty). It seems to me that in some nations with unstable governments and severe economic and social problems that government officials may need time to properly address the serious crime of sexual abuse/rape by priests or any one else. I may be naive, but I'm confident that because of the presence of faithful bishops and the rightful outrage of the laity that the bishops will take necessary actions regarding the mortal sin and crime of sexual abuse/rape in our nation and in Western European nations. I do believe that the great majority of priests in our nation are faithful to their vow of celibacy. As a Catholic who's gay, some years ago I gave into temptation and had sex with men. However, I regretted my acts, and received forgiveness and consolation in the Sacrament of Reconciliation. I imagine that some otherwise good priests who are committed to remaining celibate have on occasion given in to temptation and had sex with women. However, I believe that God is merciful, and that these priests can also find forgiveness in the Sacrament of Reconciliation (and hopefully have done so). Finally, by praying to the Holy Spirit for fortitude I believe priests can have the strength to remain true to their vows.

arthur mccaffrey
2 months 1 week ago

when you read mumbo jumbo like this it sounds like the bishops are a bunch of dummies who know nuttin' and will need to be taken by the hand to point out that sleeping with seminarians is taboo and bad for recruitment. Does Cupich really believe that Catholics are so dumb as to swallow this swill? Will any arrests be made during the session on accountability or will the bishops just swap names of good criminal attorneys ? "ok, bye, see you next year--stay out of trouble--ha ha!"

Lisa M
2 months 1 week ago

We must never forget that Jesus too was betrayed by one of his chosen disciples, and to Peter he said upon this rock I shall build my Church. If we follow Peter, we follow the Church, and no matter how many betray the Church, she will not fall. The realization of the extent of the corruption, betrayal, indifference and deceitfulness is beyond disheartening, yet we must have hope that this truth will lead to the purging of the Judas' amongst our priests and bishops.

John McCauley
2 months 1 week ago

How discouraginging indeed. A horrifying display of the same "mumbo jumbo" from the latest Vatican parrot. Calling for a synod or a summit or a prayer meeting, after 30 years is not a concrete action. "Starting to 'get organized' or showboating with regard to what looks like a remedial training program for bishops is not "taking action". If Cardinal Cupich can't be specific or provide some simple clarity, can we please avoid giving him the stage where he just ladles on more obscure language and ambiguity? What are the specific actions, reporting instruments and systems, specific rules and directives for real and open collaboration with law agencies, pre-screening measures, penalties, punishments ? Having a puppet for the Vatican prattle on about holding hands, praying, and attending a two day listening seminar on how to hear the victims better is almost comedic, if the issue and the continued display of Church's inability to act, along with its historic gross negligence, dishonesty and incompetence wasn't so tragic. Hard to hope or find a silver lining in this gathering -- seems to be a real display on why this institution is incapable of solving this problem and providing a coherent global platform that protects all followers.

Kevin Murphy
2 months 1 week ago

It would be laughable if it wasn't so sad. Total nonsense and coverup, particularly in light of interview with Cardinal O'Malley, who has been pushed aside. Francis continues to protect the abusers.

Lisa M
2 months 1 week ago

I think we should be cautious about judging the outcome before it has even taken place. The solution will not cause change overnight. It would appear to me that the root of these problems is an absence of empathy, kindness, faith and integrity among the priests and bishops involved. Discernment is necessary. Our outrage should not block us from feeling hope, or placing guilt on all of our priests and bishops. There are some wolves in sheep's clothing, and some saints among those we are casting stones. We must be very very careful, not to lay blame on individuals as if they are responsible for all that is wrong, and careful not to automatically believe those who shout the loudest, and declare the most outrage, are somehow free of this scandal.

Tim O'Leary
2 months 1 week ago

Lisa - you are failing to live by your own advice, severely judging Cardinal Muller, for example, when he is fully loyal to both the pope and the Catechism. I fully believe with you that the Holy Spirit is there to protect the Church, but not only through holy and wise men, but also weak and foolish men. There have been several of the latter throughout history in the seat of Peter and the marvel is the longevity and stability of the Church and its teaching. I believe Pope Francis is orthodox and fully wants to follow the Holy Spirit, but it is very obvious that he has made errors of judgment and errors of inaction/action. The problem in the Church today is not an absence of empathy or kindness, but a preoccupation of these good attributes, to the detriment of order and procedures and judgment to quickly expel those who are not even trying to teach or follow the faith. There are too many in the episcopacy who are worldly and prefer popularity and approval of the evil secular world to the harder challenge of teaching the Gospel. Surely, there is sufficient warning in the words of Jesus of this great temptation.

Lisa M
2 months 1 week ago

Tim- I agree that I have judged Cardinal Muller harshly, but it is precisely because he has not been loyal where my outrage stems. His Manifesto was nothing short of an affront to our Pope. While he selectively chose to support Church teaching by referencing the Catechism, he ignored the Magisterium and Church teachings on religious submission of the intellect and will (Canon law 752, 753, 754) and chose instead to undermine Pope Francis' teaching on the possibility of reconciliation and communion for some divorced and 'remarried' Catholics who in very particular circumstances may be in a position to receive these sacraments. He appeared to be attempting to undermine him regarding his comments on Islam, and he has joined others in rejecting teachings, choosing not a road of discernment, as Pope Francis has called for, but a high road, of I know better, and therefore, ultimately rejecting Church teaching, which Jesus said "And I will give to thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven. And whatsoever thou shalt bind upon earth, it shall be bound also in heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt loose on earth, it shall be loosed also in heaven".

While the Manifesto may have provided much wanted 'clarity' to those seeking the Pope's removal, it was anything but clear to those who seek truth. it is not Pope Francis causing confusion, it is those undermining him. One need only read a blurb on Lifesite news to see the 'fruits' borne of a wolf in sheep's clothing.

I agree with you that the Holy Spirit does not only protect the Church through holy and wise men, but also foolish and weak. History has indeed proven that to be the case, and yes, this pope has made mistakes too, but his will and determination to bring us all onboard is clear. I also agree with you 100% that many have become worldly and seek approval and popularity over the challenges of teaching the gospel. They have let us down. I just don't see that there has been any focus on kindness and empathy and integrity, for if there was, how could so many have closed their eyes and rolled over, knowing there were children at risk?

My one hope is that I will never hear the words 'credible allegations' again coming from a bishop's mouth, knowing that they are merely used to deflect the reality that they were given plenty of warnings, and often plenty of allegations, but credible, it seems, is only credible if the victim comes forward. So, all the other complaints, go unanswered, unaddressed, and the perpetrator goes unchallenged, preying on others until, finally one of the many victim speaks. Only then does it end. Hopefully, this is what will change, where they will now be held accountable for being indifferent. To those little soldiers who have, and continue to suffer in silence, let us hope this will be a turning point.

Tim O'Leary
2 months 1 week ago

Lisa - On Cardinal Müller, I think he was doing what every bishop or cardinal should do for their own region, as has happened since the Church began (see for example Athanasius of Alexandria, in C4). I believe Müller was addressing the confusion in the German Church regarding doctrine, particularly, with respect to Islam, non-Catholic Christians and non-practicing & uneducated Catholics, of which there are now many in Germany. Müller has an obligation, as all bishops do, to respond to questions on the faith in their region. In his manifesto, he never attacks or criticizes Pope Francis, and his statements should only be seen as differing from the Holy Father in emphasis and focus. Note the Holy Father says he has not departed from any doctrine. So, both agree we are dealing with different and even legitimate interpretations, not NEW Doctrine.. Here is the full text (https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/column/manifesto-of-faith-3978) which is essentially a reaffirmation of the Catechism, which the Holy Father also promotes. As regards Amoris Laetitia, or any document ever written by a bishop or pope, everyone would have to agree with Müller's general statement that “Amoris Laetitia must clearly be interpreted in the light of the whole doctrine of the Church.” (2017 interview). The media prefers to spin everything as opposition when each is trying to be faithful.

Lisa M
2 months 1 week ago

Tim-Thank you for offering a different perspective. I am guilty of not considering another possible, more favourable view of Cardinal Muller's manifesto. Truthfully, however, I just don't buy it. It is my understanding that Cardinal Muller had the manifesto translated into at least four languages, and forwarded them to specific papers. That alone suggests it was intended for a much wider audience than his German flock. I would also have to believe that Cardinal Muller was not aware of any dissent within the ranks concerning Pope Francis, for to be aware, and to put forth a manifesto absent of any mention of the pope, as a sign of unity and understanding and clarity is deeply troubling. It defies logic that he is unaware. While his statements can be seen as differing on emphasis and focus, his decision to discuss divorced and civilly marriage couples, his choice, without mentioning it in the context of Amoris Laetitia, is showing dissent. Of course Amores Laetitia is to be viewed in light of all church doctrine, but to ignore it completely is not giving full context to the topic, and therefore, at best lessening the true teaching. That is what the so called 'orthodox catholics' are demanding clarification on, and he ignores it? Doesn't fly.

I have no doubt those leading the anti Francis crusade believe they are the protectors of the faith. I just believe they are victims of their own egos, and their lack of humility is misguiding them. For our faith makes it very very clear who will be the beholder of the truth. History has shown this to be the case over and over again, even under bad popes. So when something is taught that surprises us, and we don't understand, we don't blame the Pope. We read, and read, and read again, and reflect, reflect and reflect again until we understand, and if we can't, we accept that it is us lacking, not the Vicar of Christ.

John Sharpe
2 months 1 week ago

Does anyone want to hear a homily from Cardinal Blase Cupich ??? That’s the acid test with those still sitting in the pews!

Timothy Williams
2 months ago

And who will protect the faithful from the likes of Cupich?

Advertisement

The latest from america

Answering perhaps the most significant question of the early 2020 election season, former Vice President Joe Biden will launch his presidential campaign on Thursday.
Pope Francis greets Benedictine Abbot Bernardo Gianni during the Lenten retreat for the Roman Curia in Ariccia, Italy, on March 10. (CNS photo/Vatican Media via Reuters) 
Reforming the Vatican Curia has been a goal since the Second Vatican Council, but so far the changes have failed to improve its efficiency or responsiveness. Pope Francis is trying again.
Thomas J. ReeseApril 24, 2019
Holy Communion is the Lord’s way of saying that we need never be apart from him in our lives. He will always be there for us. As Pooh puts it, “If there ever comes a day when we can’t be together, keep me in your heart, I’ll stay there forever.”
Terrance KleinApril 24, 2019
C.S. Lewis does not come to lovely conclusions about his God or his religion or his suffering. He asks many more questions than he answers. He rants, questions, weeps and feels terrible, deservedly sorry for himself and for the woman he loved so much and has now lost. And in doing so, he renders in
Jessica MesmanApril 24, 2019