What’s behind the stalled U.S. bishops’ vote on sex abuse?

Bishop Kevin C. Rhoades of Fort Wayne-South Bend, Ind., bows his head as he listens to a speaker Nov. 13 at the fall general assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Baltimore. (CNS photo / Bob Roller)

This week on “Inside the Vatican,” Gerry and I devote the entire show to recent developments in the sexual abuse crisis.

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First, we look at Monday’s news that the Vatican had asked the U.S. bishops not to vote on sexual abuse resolutions at their highy-anticipated November meeting. We examine some of the possible reasons behind this request from the Vatican and ask why there seems to be a gap in communication between bishops in the U.S. and Rome.

Interwoven into this conversation is the Tuesday appointment of Vatican sexual abuse prosecutor Archbishop Charles Scicluna to a position that will allow him to shape the upcoming international meeting of bishops on sexual abuse.

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Tim Gannon
11 months ago

Can anyone tell me if this is true?
https://www.social-consciousness.com/2017/07/unprecedented-amount-of-child-porn-discovered-in-the-vatican.html?fbclid=IwAR3FUQYbOLkyjWPGT_ZMgJErRED_uh6EJ8wwwaTI7KLQRRC_t-OOOEchXFY
Most distressing read.

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